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Samsung Note 7’s battery reportedly caused fires in the device

UAE News - 11 hours 54 min ago

South Korean electronics giant Samsung's investigation into what caused many Galaxy Note 7s to explode and catch fire has indicated that the battery was the main culprit, according to emerging media reports.

Citing an anonymous person familiar with the matter, several media outlets also reported that Samsung will likely officially announce the results of its investigation on January 23rd, a day before announcing its fourth-quarter results.

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Categories: UAE News

Samsung apparently leaks Galaxy S8

UAE News - Sat, 01/14/2017 - 10:12

Electronics giant Samsung recently released two different adverts showing off its new AMOLED displays, but the real star of the show is a mysterious smartphone that showed up in both adverts. The unique design of the mysterious device prompted many to predict that it might be the Galaxy S8.

Samsung hasn't yet officially announced the Galaxy S8, but the company is widely expected to introduce the eagerly-awaited smartphone sometime in spring this year.

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Categories: UAE News

Don't consider your child as 'overweight'! It might lead to more weight gain

Health News - Sat, 01/14/2017 - 09:48

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 14 : Do you see your child as 'overweight'? May be that is the reason for his/her gaining more weight over the period of time.

A study says that children whose parents considered them to be 'overweight,' tended to gain more weight over the following decade, compared with children, whose parents thought they were a 'normal' weight.

This has been deduced from an analysis of data from two nationally representative studies, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

The findings indicate that children, whose parents identified them as being overweight, perceived their own body size more negatively and were more likely to attempt to lose weight, factors that partly accounted for their weight gain.

"Although parents' perception that their children are overweight has been presumed to be important to management of childhood obesity, recent studies have suggested the opposite; when a parent identifies a child as being overweight, that child is at increased risk of future weight gain," psychology researchers Eric Robinson from University of Liverpool and Angelina Sutin from Florida State University College of Medicine write in their paper.

Adding, "We argue that the stigma attached to being an overweight child may explain why children whose parents view them as being overweight tend to have elevated weight gain during development."

Drawing from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Robinson and Sutin examined data for 2,823 Australian families.

As part of the study, researchers measured the children's height and weight when they began the study as four or fivr-year-olds. At that time, the children's parents reported whether they thought the children were best described as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or very overweight.

Later, when they were 12 or 13, the children used a series of images depicting bodies that increased in size to indicate which image most resembled their own body size. The children also reported whether they had engaged in any behaviors in an attempt to lose weight in the previous 12 months.

Researchers took height and weight measurements again when the children were 14 or 15 years old.

The results indicated that parents' perceptions were associated with children's weight gain 10 years later: Children whose parents considered them to be overweight at age four or five tended to gain more weight by age 14 or 15.

And this association could be accounted for, at least in part, by the children's beliefs and behaviors. That is, children whose parents thought they were overweight perceived their own body size more negatively and were more likely to report attempts to lose weight.

The results were the same for boys and girls, and they could not be explained by other possible factors, such as household income, presence of a medical condition, and parents' weight.

Importantly, the link between parents' perceptions and children's later weight gain did not depend on how much the child actually weighed when they began the study.

When Robinson and Sutin examined data from 5,886 Irish families participating in the Growing Up in Ireland study, they saw the same pattern of results.

Using these data, the researchers cannot determine whether parents' perceptions actually caused their children's weight gain, but "the findings of the present studies support the proposition that parents' perception of their children as overweight could have unintended negative consequences on their children's health," Robinson and Sutin conclude. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Undergo tobacco counseling, and cut down on smoking

Health News - Sat, 01/14/2017 - 07:15

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 14 : Cutting down on smoking can now be a bit easier for you!

A study, published in Annals of Family Medicine, says that tobacco counseling for youth or adults can reduce the prevalence of smoking cigarettes during adult years.

The researchers conducted a microsimulation analysis to estimate the health impact and cost-effectiveness of tobacco counseling of youth and adults in a U.S. birth cohort of 4,000,000.

They found that the model predicted that annual counseling for youth would reduce the average prevalence of smoking cigarettes by 2.0 percent during adult years, whereas annual counseling for adults would reduce prevalence by 3.8 percent, compared with no tobacco counseling.

Over the lifetime of the cohort, youth counseling would prevent 42,686 smoking-attributable fatalities and increase quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) by 756,601; 69,901 smoking-attributable fatalities would be prevented by adult counseling, and QALYs would be increased by 1,044,392.

Per person, youth and adult counseling would yield net savings of 225 dollars and 580 dollars, respectively. Adult smoking prevalence would be 5.5 percent lower if annual tobacco counseling was provided to the cohort during both youth and adult years, compared with no counseling, with 105,917 fewer smoking-attributable fatalities over their lifetime. At current counseling rates, only one-third of the potential health and economic benefits of counseling are being realized.

"Both youth and adult intervention are high-priority uses of limited clinician time," the authors write. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Consumer Reports recommends MacBook Pro laptops after software update

UAE News - Fri, 01/13/2017 - 09:34

In an update to its original MacBook Pro evaluation, Consumer Reports has recommended laptops running a macOS 10.12.3 beta as the battery life issue has been fixed.

Consumer Reports recommended MacBook Pro laptops after finishing retesting of the laptops following software update by Apple, the Cupertino-based manufacturer of the machines.

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Categories: UAE News

Beware! Burgers, chips at lunch may cause food comas

Health News - Fri, 01/13/2017 - 06:58

London [England], Jan. 13 : Next time, think twice before you eat that burger or chips during lunch, as a new study reveals that eating a meal particularly high in protein and salt can make us feel more fatigued and causes us to fall into a 'food coma'.

According to researchers, if you have had a particularly huge meal, then you may even fall into a food coma - postprandial somnolence- where all you want to do is lie down and have a snooze.

The findings indicated that protein and salt are the causes of the infamous food coma, the reason being that they are "expensive commodities," so our bodies have to work harder to digest them and extract the nutrients.

The researchers from from Bowling Green State University in Ohio and Florida's Scripps Research Institute found that carbohydrates did not have the same effect, despite various dieticians having previously claimed carbohydrate-rich foods make us sleepy.

They used fruit-flies to investigate the neurobiological links between eating and sleep.

The study found that sugar actually does not actually contribute to a food coma.

The researchers are yet to discover, however, why sleep helps us digest protein and salt, but it is clear that is what our bodies want to do.

"During the food coma, the flies remain still for a certain amount of time and they are much less responsive to any kind of other cues than they would normally be," said study's author Dr. Robert Huber.

"There's clearly something very potent about sleep itself," he added.

So, if you want to be on top form this afternoon, it's perhaps wise to opt for a healthy veggie option for lunch, they concluded. (ANI)

Region: LondonGeneral: Health

PC sales decline for fifth year in a row

UAE News - Thu, 01/12/2017 - 10:30

Sales of desktop and laptop computers slipped for the fifth consecutive year in 2016, marking a continued decline in the market since 2012, two market trackers reported.

According to Gartner, shipments of personal computers slipped 6.2 per cent year over year in 2016. Internation Data Corporation pegged total PC shipments at 260 million, suggesting a decline of 5.7 per cent from the previous year.

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Categories: UAE News

Attention parents! Superhero culture may up aggression in your kids

Health News - Thu, 01/12/2017 - 06:10

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 12 : Is your kid fascinated with superheroes? Does he love to dress up like a Spiderman thinking that he will go around pretending to spin webs?

Dear parents, a new study warns that kids, who frequently engage with superhero culture, are more likely to be physically and relationally aggressive.

The research appears in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.

Researchers from Brigham Young University in the US found that children, who frequently engage with superhero culture are more likely to be physically and relationally aggressive one year later.

"Our study shows the exact opposite. Kids pick up on the aggressive themes and not the defending ones," said lead author Sarah M. Coyne.

The findings like these give parents the opportunity to have a conversation with their children.

The participants in the study consisted of 240 children, whose parents responded about the level of engagement their kids had with the superhero culture.

The children were individually interviewed and asked to identify their 10 popular superheroes.

The results indicated that 20 percent of these children associated their favorite superhero with some type of violent skills.

The remaining 70 percent of skills-related comments by children were benign in nature: "Because he is big and strong" and "Because he is cool and can fly."

These programs contain complex storylines that interweave violence and prosocial behaviour and preschoolers do not have the cognitive capability to pick out the wider moral message that is often portrayed.

Coyne further stated there is likely some additional desensitization associated with consuming violent media.

They explained that reduction in cognitive and emotional responses has been shown to be associated with exposure to violent media.

However, the superhero culture can become consuming especially if kids are watching the movies, playing with the toys, strongly identifying with the characters, dressing up etc, they concluded. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Zuckerberg & his wife trying to build political muscle for philanthropic causes

UAE News - Wed, 01/11/2017 - 09:51

Facebook founder & CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Dr. Priscilla Chan, who have pledged to put their huge wealth toward philanthropic causes, have hired a top political operative to build political muscle for their philanthropic work.

In 2015, Zuckerberg and his wife set up the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, a limited liability company to carry out charitable efforts. Now, they have hired David Plouffe, who managed President Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign, as president of policy and advocacy for the non-profit.

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Categories: UAE News

Has Cancer found its bane in Vitamin C?

Health News - Wed, 01/11/2017 - 06:12

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 11 : US researchers have found that giving Vitamin C intravenously can produce super-high concentration in the blood, which has ability to attack cancer cells.

The findings, published recently in the journal Redox Biology, revealed that vitamin C breaks down easily, generating hydrogen peroxide, a so-called reactive oxygen species that can damage tissue and DNA.

Researchers from University of Iowa Health Care in the US also showed that tumor cells are much less capable of removing the damaging hydrogen peroxide than normal cells.

They also found that giving vitamin C intravenously--and bypassing normal gut metabolism and excretion pathways--creates blood levels that are 100 - 500 times higher than levels seen with oral ingestion.

"In this paper we demonstrate that cancer cells are much less efficient in removing hydrogen peroxide than normal cells. Thus, cancer cells are much more prone to damage and death from a high amount of hydrogen peroxide," said Garry Buettner.

"This explains how the very, very high levels of vitamin C used in our clinical trials do not affect normal tissue, but can be damaging to tumor tissue," Buettner added.

They examined how high-dose vitamin C (also known as ascorbate) kills cancer cells.

The team tested the approach in clinical trials for pancreatic cancer and lung cancer that combine high-dose, intravenous vitamin C with standard chemotherapy or radiation.

The new study shows that an enzyme called catalase is the central route for removing hydrogen peroxide generated by decomposing vitamin C.

The researchers discovered that cells with lower amounts of catalase activity were more susceptible to damage and death when they were exposed to high amounts of vitamin C.

"Our results suggest that cancers with low levels of catalase are likely to be the most responsive to high-dose vitamin C therapy, whereas cancers with relatively high levels of catalase may be the least responsive," he explained. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Production of action game Scalebound has reportedly been terminated

UAE News - Tue, 01/10/2017 - 09:40

Microsoft has terminated the production of Scalebound, one of the Xbox One's most eagerly-awaited video games, emerging reports suggest.  

Scalebound, which started life as a single-player spree through a dream world of dragons and monsters, was first revealed by director Hideki Kamiya at Microsoft's E3 press conference in 2014.

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Categories: UAE News

Dear parents! Your regular exercise routine may set habit in your kids

Health News - Tue, 01/10/2017 - 07:03

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 10 : Dear parents, if you exercise regularly, then it can directly affect the health of your kids in childhood as well as adulthood.

A new study suggests that kids aged three to five are more likely to be physically active if their parents increase activity and reduce sedentary lifestyle.

The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, examined the impact of parent modeling of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in low-income American ethnic minorities, included data from more than 1,000 parent-child pairs.

The participants live in metro areas of Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota and Nashville, Tennessee.

Each parent and child wore an accelerometer for an average of 12 hours a day, for a week.

This is the first study to link the physical activity of parents and young children by objectively measuring that physical activity with such a long wear time for an accelerometer.

Researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center in the US found that the preschoolers' total physical activity was 6.03 hours per day with 1.5 hours spent in moderate to vigorous activity.

"This study highlights how important parents' physical activity is to shaping their young children's physical activity," said principal investigator Shari Barkin.

"The good news is that increasing physical activity is not only good for parents' health, it also helps set these behaviours in their young children as well. It's doubly good for family health. Setting this habit early could impact good health not only in childhood but in adulthood as well," Barkin added.

Physical activity is a critical factor for preventing childhood obesity and promoting good cardiovascular health.

Recommendations call for preschoolers is to obtain about three hours a day of total physical activity (light, moderate and vigorous) with at least one hour of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

The reports show that less than half of preschoolers actually achieve that recommendation.

They also found that up to 40 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity by a parent correlated with their preschool-age child's level of MVPA.

Similarly, for every minute a parent engaged in light physical activity, the child's light physical activity increased by 0.06 minutes. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

A quick look at Huawei’s Mate 9 phablet

UAE News - Mon, 01/09/2017 - 09:53

Guangdong, China-headquartered Huawei recently unveiled its flagship phablet, the Mate 9, at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The Huawei Mate 9 isn't a brand new device as the company launched it in November 2016 in Berlin. At CES 2017, the company announced the availability of the phablet in the United States as well.

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Categories: UAE News

How long will you live? Your blood test can give the answer

Health News - Sun, 01/08/2017 - 04:17

London [UK], Jan. 8 : If it's true, it could be a game changer!

Believe it or not, scientists at Boston University claim to have discovered a game-changing blood test that could help predict lifespans.

The study, published in the journal Aging Cell on Friday, used biomarker data collected from 5,000 blood samples and analysed it against the donors' health developments over the subsequent eight years.

Together, they identified patterns which indicated both good and bad futures. Specifically, their chances of getting age-related diseases, such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes.

In all, the researchers generated 26 different predictive biomarker signatures.

The breakthrough means patients will be able to identify realistic health risks early on - and, crucially, modify behaviour to change the outcome.

Lead authors Professors Dr Paola Sebastiani and Dr Thomas Perls said: 'These signatures depict differences in how people age, and they show promise in predicting healthy ageing, changes in cognitive and physical function, survival and age-related diseases like heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and cancer.

'It sets the stage for a molecular-based definition of ageing that leverages information from multiple circulating biomarkers to generate signatures associated with different mortality and morbidity risk.'

They added: 'Many prediction and risk scores already exist for predicting specific diseases like heart disease.

'Here, though, we are taking another step by showing that particular patterns of groups of biomarkers can indicate how well a person is ageing and his or her risk for specific age-related syndromes and diseases.'

The researchers noted that more studies on larger groups of people are still needed to further confirm the results. (ANI)

Region: United KingdomGeneral: Health

Hackers unlock NES Classic & successfully add new games via USB cable

UAE News - Sat, 01/07/2017 - 09:20

Announcing NES Classic Edition this holiday season, Nintendo declared that it wouldn't officially receive new games, particularly with no WiFi protocol to download them. But that failed to prevent hackers from adding games their own way.

At Reddit's NESClassicMods community, the whiz kids suggested that one can add games to the system via USB cable. However, this solution will not work until one has created a save file in the first slot of Super Mario Bros.

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Categories: UAE News

Witnessing fear in loved ones can cause PSTD

Health News - Sat, 01/07/2017 - 06:10

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 7 : A study reveals that if a person hears about a serious incident -- such as a gunfire exchange - from his/her loved ones or even strangers, it may change how information flows in the brain and can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Scientists in the study, published in Neuropsychopharmacology, observed that fear in others may change how information flows in the brain.

Post-traumatic stress disorder, also called PTSD, is an anxiety disorder that can develop in some people after they experience a shocking, scary, or dangerous event, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

"Negative emotional experience leaves a trace in the brain, which makes us more vulnerable," said lead study author Alexei Morozov from Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute in the US.

"Traumatic experiences, even those without physical pain, are a risk factor for mental disorders," Morozov added.

The team observed that most people, who live through dangerous events, do not develop the disorder, but about seven or eight out of every 100 people will experience post-traumatic stress disorder at some point in their lives.

"PTSD doesn't stop at direct victims of illness, injury, or a terrorist attack; it can also affect their loved ones, caregivers, even bystanders -- the people who witness or learn about others' suffering," Morozov stated.

Based on these findings, the researchers investigated whether the part of the brain responsible for empathising and understanding the mental state of others, called the prefrontal cortex, physically changes after witnessing fear in another.

Lei Liu, a post-doctoral researcher in the lab, measured transmission through inhibitory synapses that regulate strength of the signals arriving in the prefrontal cortex from other parts of the brain in mice who had witnessed a stressful event in another mouse.

"Liu's measures suggest that observational fear physically redistributes the flow of information," Morozov said,

"And this redistribution is achieved by stress, not just observed, but communicated through social cues, such as body language, sound, and smell." (ANI)

Region: United StatesGeneral: Health

Now, apps on your smartphone can cut depression, anxiety

Health News - Sat, 01/07/2017 - 04:40

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 7 : Now smartphones can help you treat your depression and anxiety.

Researchers from Northwestern University in the United States found that 13 speedy mini-apps called 'IntelliCare' significantly reduced 50 percent depression and anxiety in participants, who used the apps on their smartphones up to four times a day using psychotherapy or with antidepressant medication.

The study was published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

The applications offer exercises to de-stress, reduce self-criticism and worrying, methods to help your life feel more meaningful, mantras to highlight your strengths, strategies for a good night's sleep and more.

"We designed these apps so they fit easily into people's lives and could be used as simply as apps to find a restaurant or directions," said lead study author David Mohr from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

"Some of the participants kept using them after the study because they felt that the apps helped them feel better," Mohr added.

In the study, 105 participants were enrolled and 96 of them completed the study.

The participants robustly used the IntelliCare interactive apps as many as four times daily -- or an average of 195 times -- for eight weeks.

The participants received eight weeks of coaching for the use of IntelliCare, which included an initial phone call, plus two or more text messages per week over the observation period.

They spent an average of one minute using each app, with longer times for apps with relaxation videos.

The participants, who completed in the research study, reported that they experienced about a 50 percent decrease in the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms.

"Using digital tools for mental health is emerging as an important part of our future," Mohr stated.

"These are designed to help the millions of people who want support but can't get to a therapist's office," he noted. (ANI)

Region: United StatesGeneral: Health

Americans won’t be able to buy Xiaomi’s white Mi Mix smartphone

UAE News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 09:06

Chinese electronics giant Xiaomi Inc. unveiled a white version of its Mi Mix smartphone at the CES 2017 tech show in Las Vegas on Thursday, but the device will not be launched in the U. S. market.

Many had been expecting the Chinese manufacturer to announce its international expansion to make its products available in markets like the U. S., Canada, and Western Europe. But, company representatives said that Americans will not be able to get their hands on the new product for some time.

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Categories: UAE News

Dear parents, here's what you can do to prevent peanut allergy in kids

Health News - Fri, 01/06/2017 - 06:57

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 6 : A panel of experts says you can prevent development of peanut allergy in your kids by introducing foods containing peanuts until five years of age.

Clinical trial results showed that regular peanut consumption begun in infancy and continued until five years of age led to an 81 percent reduction in development of peanut allergy in infants deemed at high risk because they already had severe eczema, egg allergy or both.

According to researchers, people living with peanut allergy and their caregivers must be vigilant about the foods they eat and the environments they enter to avoid allergic reactions, which can be severe and even life-threatening.

The allergy tends to develop in childhood and persist through adulthood.

However, recent scientific research has demonstrated that introducing peanut-containing foods into the diet during infancy can prevent the development of peanut allergy.

"Living with peanut allergy requires constant vigilance. Preventing the development of peanut allergy will improve and save lives and lower health care costs," said researcher Anthony S. Fauci director of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

"We expect that widespread implementation of these guidelines by health care providers will prevent the development of peanut allergy in many susceptible children and ultimately reduce the prevalence of peanut allergy in the United States," Fauci added.

In all cases, infants should start other solid foods before they are introduced to peanut-containing foods.

This finding came from the landmark, NIAID-funded Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study, a randomised clinical trial involving more than 600 infants.

"The LEAP study clearly showed that introduction of peanut early in life significantly lowered the risk of developing peanut allergy by age five," said another study author Daniel Rotrosen director of NIAID's Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation.

"The magnitude of the benefit and the scientific strength of the study raised the need to operationalise these findings by developing clinical recommendations focused on peanut allergy prevention," Rotrosen added. (ANI)

Region: United StatesGeneral: Health

Good news! Pre-mature babies do better in early language development

Health News - Thu, 01/05/2017 - 06:45

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 5 : Pre-mature babies perform well in a developmental task linking language and cognition compared to their full-term counterparts, finds a new study.

The study was published online in journal of Developmental Science.

Researchers from Northwestern University in the US found that preterm infants are maturationally on par with full-term infants in establishing this link.

The study, the first of its kind with preterm infants, tests the relative contributions of infants' experience and maturational status.

The team compared healthy preterm and full-term infants at the same maturational age, or age since conception.

"This study permits us to tease apart -- for the first time ever -- the roles of infants' early experience and maturational status in establishing this critical language-cognition link," said senior study author Sandra Waxman.

To illustrate, they considered two infants conceived on the same date.

If one happens to be born a month early, then although the infants will always share the same maturational age (age since conception), the preterm infant will have an opportunity to acquire an extra month of postnatal experience listening to language.

They compared preterm and full-term infants to identify the developmental timing of their link between language and object categorization.

The new study was designed to capitalise on this tightly timed "familiarity-to-novelty" shift in full-term infants.

The results showed a robust early link between language and cognition in preterm infants, revealing that this vulnerable population begins life with a strong foundation for linking language and meaning.

Pediatric evidence revealed that although healthy preterm infants reach some developmental milestones on the same maturational timetable as their full-term peers, they nevertheless tend to encounter obstacles in language, cognitive and attentional processing capacities. This is evident in their use of early intervention services from infancy through school age. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

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