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Too much sugar may causes Alzheimer's

Health News - Fri, 02/24/2017 - 05:33

London [UK], Feb. 24 : A diet, high in sugar, could lead to Alzheimers, as a study finds a link between sugar and the brain disease.

According to researchers from the University of Bath and King's College London, this is the first concrete evidence to explain why abnormally high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycaemia, have an impact on cognitive function, reports Telegraph.co.uk.

Unprecedented research has revealed the 'tipping point' at which blood sugar levels become so dangerous they allow the neurological disease to take hold.

Once levels pass the threshold, they restrict the performance of a vital protein, which normally fights the brain inflammation associated with dementia.

"Excess sugar is well known to be bad for us when it comes to diabetes and obesity, but this potential link with Alzheimer's disease is yet another reason that we should be controlling our sugar intake in our diets," said Dr Omar Kassaar.

In Alzheimer's abnormal proteins aggregate to form plaques and tangles in the brain which progressively damage the brain and lead to severe cognitive decline.

Using brain samples of 30 patients with and without Alzheimer's and tested them for protein glycation, a modification caused by high glucose levels in the blood.

They found that in the early stages of Alzheimer's glycation damages an enzyme called MIF (macrophage migration inhibitory factor) which plays a role in immune response and insulin regulation.

MIF is involved in the response of brain cells called glia to the build-up of abnormal proteins in the brain during Alzheimer's disease.

It appears that as Alzheimer's progresses, glycation of these enzymes increases.

"We've shown that this enzyme is already modified by glucose in the brains of individuals at the early stages of Alzheimer's disease," said Jean van den Elsen from Bath's department of biology and biochemistry.

"Normally MIF would be part of the immune response to the build-up of abnormal proteins in the brain, and we think that because sugar damage reduces some MIF functions and completely inhibits others that this could be a tipping point that allows Alzheimer's to develop," Elsen added. (ANI)

Region: LondonGeneral: Health

Teens drowsy during mid-afternoon are 4.5 times more likely to commit crimes in adulthood

Health News - Fri, 02/24/2017 - 05:28

Washington D.C. [US], Feb. 24 : Parents, please take note! A study warns teenagers who self-report feeling drowsy during mid-afternoon, are 4.5 times more likely to commit violent crimes a decade and a half later.

Research from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of York daytime drowsiness is associated with poor attention. They take poor attention as a proxy for poor brain function and if you have got poor brain functioning, then you are more likely to be criminal.

"It's the first study to our knowledge to show that daytime sleepiness during teenage years are associated with criminal offending 14 years later," said Adrian Raine from University of Pennsylvania in US.

The study was published in the journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

"A lot of the prior research focused on sleep problems, but in our study we measured, very simply, how drowsy the child is during the day," Raine added.

To get at this information, he tested 101 boys aged 15-year-old from three secondary schools in the north of England.

At the start and end of each lab session, which always ran from one to three p.m., he asked participants to rate their degree of sleepiness on a seven-point scale, with one being 'unusually alert' and seven being 'sleepy.'

He also collected data about anti-social behaviour, both self-reported from the study participants, as well as from two or three teachers who had worked with each teenager for at least four years.

"Actually, the teacher and child reports correlated quite well in this study, which is not usual. Often, what the teacher says, what the parent says, what the child says -- it's usually three different stories," Raine stated.

Finally, the team conducted a computerised search at the Central Criminal Records Office in London of the original 101 participants.

The results suggested that 17 percent of participants had committed a crime by that point in adulthood.

"Is it the case that low social class and early social adversity results in daytime drowsiness, which results in inattention or brain dysfunction.

The researchers suggested that knowing this could potentially help with a simple treatment plan for children with behavioral issues, children are recommend to get more sleep at night. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

T-Mobile obtains FCC’s approval for deploying LTE-U technology

UAE News - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 09:21

Telecommunications giant T-Mobile USA has gained regulatory approval to deploy a new LTE technology over the same 5GHz frequencies that are used by Wi-Fi.

The U. S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) authorized the company's plan for launching the first LTE-U devices after the company assured the regulator that cellular network use of the 5GHz frequencies will not interfere with existing Wi-Fi networks.

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Categories: UAE News

Beware! Those pills to reduce gastric acid may silently damage your kidney: Study

Health News - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 06:09

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 23 : Beware! US researchers warned that taking drugs to reduce gastric acid for prolonged periods may lead to serious kidney problems, including kidney failure.

Taking popular heartburn drugs for prolonged periods has been linked to serious kidney problems.

Heartburn is the form of indigestion as burning sensation in the chest, caused by acid regurgitation into the oesophagus.

According to researchers from Washington university in St. Louis, the sudden onset of kidney problems often serves as a red flag for doctors to discontinue their patients' use of so-called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) that reduce the secretion of gastric (stomach) acid.

The study appeared in the journal of Kidney International.

"Our results indicate kidney problems can develop silently and gradually over time, eroding kidney function and leading to long-term kidney damage or even renal failure. Patients should be cautioned to tell their doctors if they're taking PPIs and only use the drugs when necessary," said study's senior author Ziyad Al-Aly.

The team analysed 1,25,596 new users of PPIs and 18,436 new users of other heartburn drugs referred to as H2 blockers. The latter are much less likely to cause kidney problems but often aren't as effective.

Over five years of follow up study, the results indicated that more than 80 percent of PPI users did not develop acute kidney problems, which often are reversible and are characterised by too little urine leaving the body, fatigue and swelling in the legs and ankles.

More than half of the cases of chronic kidney damage and end-stage renal disease associated with PPI use occurred in people without acute kidney problems.

"Doctors must pay careful attention to kidney function in their patients who use PPIs, even when there are no signs of problems," cautioned Al-Aly.

"In general, we always advise clinicians to evaluate whether PPI use is medically necessary in the first place because the drugs carry significant risks, including a deterioration of kidney function," Al-Aly concluded. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Beware! Food-borne bacterium may cause miscarriage threat early in pregnancy

Health News - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 09:56

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 22 : Beware to-be mothers! Listeria, a common food-borne bacterium, may pose a greater risk of miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy than appreciated, warns a study.

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in US showed that pathogens affect fetal development and change the outcome of pregnancy.

"For many years, listeria has been associated with adverse outcomes in pregnancy, but particularly at the end of pregnancy," said Ted Golos.

"What wasn't known with much clarity before this study is that it appears it's a severe risk factor in early pregnancy," Golos added, "It's striking that mom doesn't get particularly ill from listeria infection, but it has a profound impact on the fetus."

The study appeared in the journal mBio.

"The problem with this organism is not a huge number of cases. It's that when it is identified, it's associated with severe outcomes," said Charles Czuprynski, a UW-Madison professor of pathobiological sciences and director of the UW-Madison Food Research Institute.

Pregnant women are warned to avoid many of the foods, among them unpasteurised milk and soft cheese, raw sprouts, melon and deli meats not carefully handled, that can harbour listeria, because the bacterium is known to cause miscarriage and stillbirth and spur premature labour.

But when it occurs, listeria infection in pregnancy may go unnoticed. The few recognisable symptoms are nearly indistinguishable from the discomfort most newly pregnant women feel.

Sophia Kathariou, a North Carolina State University professor of food science and microbiology, provided a strain of listeria that caused miscarriage, stillbirth and premature delivery in at least 11 pregnant women in 2000.

Four pregnant rhesus macaques at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center were fed doses of the listeria comparable to what one might encounter in contaminated food.

None of the monkeys showed obvious signs of infection before their pregnancies came to abrupt ends.

But, in tissue samples taken after each monkey experienced intrauterine fetal death, Wolfe found listeria had invaded the placenta -- the connection between the mother-to-be and the fetus, which usually prevents transmission of bacteria -- as well as the endometrium, the lining of the uterus.

"In that region, there's a rich population of specialised immune cells and it is exquisitely regulated," said lead researcher Bryce Wolfe.

"When you introduce a pathogen into the midst of this, it's not very surprising that it's going to cause some sort of adverse outcome disrupting this balance," Wolfe added.

The researchers believe the inflammation caused by the maternal immune response to the fast-moving listeria also affects the placenta, keeping it from protecting the fetus.

The results suggest listeria (and perhaps other pathogens) may be the culprit in some miscarriages that usually go without diagnosed cause, but the bacteria's stealth and speed may still make it hard to control.

"There are effective antibiotics available. It is treatable and the fetus may be infected by the time anyone realises the mother was infected," he stated. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Snap’s Spectacles available online

UAE News - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 09:32

Days after releasing a "Roadshow" video to attract potential investors for its IPO, Snap Inc. has announced the online availability of its video-recording sunglasses, called Spectacles.

The social media company, which is best known for its short-lived image and video service Snapchat, has also closed its pop-up store in New York and activated a buy button on its Spectacles. com website.

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Categories: UAE News

If your kid is too fat, then you may be a reason

Health News - Wed, 02/22/2017 - 04:34

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 22 : Now don't blame those chips and chocolates for you childs extra pounds, as a study says around 35-40 percent of a child's is inherited from their parents.

For the most obese children, the proportion rises to 55-60 percent, suggesting that more than half of their tendency towards obesity is determined by genetics and family environment.

The study, led by the University of Sussex, used data on the heights and weights of 100,000 children and their parents spanning six countries worldwide: the UK, USA, China, Indonesia, Spain and Mexico.

The researchers found that the intergenerational transmission of BMI (Body Mass Index) is approximately constant at around 0.2 per parent - i.e. that each child's BMI is, on average, 20 percent due to the mother and 20 percent due to the father.

The pattern of results, says lead author Professor Peter Dolton of the University of Sussex, is remarkably consistent across all countries, irrespective of their stage of economic development, degree of industrialisation, or type of economy.

Professor Dolton says, "Our evidence comes from trawling data from across the world with very diverse patterns of nutrition and obesity - from one of the most obese populations - USA - to two of the least obese countries in the world - China and Indonesia."

Adding, "This gives an important and rare insight into how obesity is transmitted across generations in both developed and developing countries. We found that the process of intergenerational transmission is the same across all the different countries."

The findings are published in the journal Economics and Human Biology.

The study also shows how the effect of parents' BMI on their children's BMI depends on what the BMI of the child is. Consistently, across all populations studied, they found the 'parental effect' to be lowest for the thinnest children and highest for the most obese children. For the thinnest child their BMI is 10 per cent due to their mother and 10 per cent due to their father. For the fattest child this transmission is closer to 30 per cent due to each parent.

"This shows that the children of obese parents are much more likely to be obese themselves when they grow up - the parental effect is more than double for the most obese children what it is for the thinnest children," say Professor Dolton.

"These findings have far-reaching consequences for the health of the world's children. They should make us rethink the extent to which obesity is the result of family factors, and our genetic inheritance, rather than decisions made by us as individuals," he explained. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Eric Holder to oversee Uber’s review of sexism allegations

UAE News - Tue, 02/21/2017 - 09:17

Uber has brought on former U. S. Attorney General Eric Holder to oversee an independent review of the alleged sexism allegations made by a former employee of the company, CEO Travis Kalanick announced.

In an email to employees, Kalanick wrote that the company would conduct an independent review of the alleged issue, and Mr. Holder would oversee it.

On Sunday, former employee Susan Fowler, who started working at Uber in Nov. 2015 as a site reliability engineer, wrote in a blog post about her work experience and the accused the company of sexism.

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Categories: UAE News

Maintenance program much needed to keep off pounds for long

Health News - Tue, 02/21/2017 - 05:29

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 21 : Only exercise is not enough to maintain that figure, which is an after effect of much toil and sweat!

A study by American College of Physicians say that a weight loss program that incorporates a maintenance intervention could help participants be more successful at keeping off pounds long term.

Researchers found that primarily telephone-based intervention, focused on providing strategies for maintaining weight loss modestly, slowed the rate of participants' weight regain after weight loss.

Results of a randomised trial are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Despite the efficacy of behavioral weight loss programs, weight loss maintenance remains the holy grail of weight loss research. After initial weight loss, most people tend to regain weight at a rate of about two to four pounds a year.

Teaching people weight maintenance skills has been shown to slow weight gain, but can be time and resource-intensive. Simple and effective weight maintenance interventions are needed.

Researchers tested a weight maintenance intervention on obese outpatients who had lost an average of 16 pounds during a 16-week, group-based weight loss program to determine if a low-intensity intervention could help participants keep off the weight they lost. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or usual care. The intervention focused on providing participants with skills to help them make the transition from initiating weight loss to maintaining their weight.

Over the first 42 weeks, the intervention shifted from group visits to individual telephone calls, with decreased frequency of contact. There was no intervention contact during the final 14 weeks. The usual care group had no contact except for weight assessments. After 56 weeks, mean weight regain in the intervention group was about 1.5 pounds compared to 5 pounds in the usual care group. The evidence suggests that incorporating a weight maintenance intervention into clinical or commercial weight loss programs could make them more effective over the long term. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Samsung to reportedly match Apple’s hefty price rises for upcoming Galaxy phones

UAE News - Mon, 02/20/2017 - 10:02

Samsung is going to match Apple Inc.'s planned hefty price increases which will make both the Galaxy S8 and iPhone 8 smartphones to retail for more than $1,000, SamMobile reported.

Citing a database leak, SamMobile revealed that the Galaxy S8 (SM-G950) and Galaxy S8 Plus (SM-G955) will be launched with price tags starting at $950 and $1,050 (after currency conversion), respectively.

Thus, the 2017 models of the popular Samsung smartphones will carry a circa $100 premium over their predecessors Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge.

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Categories: UAE News

Nostalgic emotions evokes stronger urge to quit smoking

Health News - Mon, 02/20/2017 - 04:29

New Delhi [India], Feb 20. : In order to persuade someone to quit smoking, it is the 'emotions' that need to be triggered rather than inciting fear in an individual.

A new study by Michigan State University researchers has found out the following which was published in Communication Research Reports.

Advertisers often use nostalgia-evoking messages to promote consumer products, and that tactic could be just as effective in encouraging healthy behaviors, argue Ali Hussain, a doctoral candidate in the School of Journalism, and Maria Lapinski, professor in the Department of Communication.

"A lot of no-smoking messages are centered around fear, disgust and guilt," Hussain said. "But smokers often don't buy the messages and instead feel badly about themselves and the person who is trying to scare them."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease in the United States, accounting for one of every five deaths. Smoking rates have declined, but in 2015, 15 of every 100 adults were active smokers.

Despite the health risks, a key hurdle for health communicators is rejection and avoidance of messages, Lapinski said.

Hoping to find a solution, researchers conducted a study of smokers, ages 18 to 39, exposing some to a nostalgic public service announcement Hussain created and some to a control message.

Those who viewed the PSA reported greater nostalgic emotions and displayed stronger negative attitudes toward smoking, especially women.

Starting with images of childhood memories, the PSA script includes phrases such as, "I remember when I was a boy" and "I miss the simplicity of life, being outside on a warm summer night," making references to familiar smells and tastes from bygone days. It ends with the narrator remembering when someone introduced him to cigarettes and a call to action. Nostalgia-themed PSAs play off consumers' most cherished and personal memories, so they feel more engaged, the researchers said. And that nostalgic thinking influences attitudes and behaviors.

"Our study, which to our knowledge is first of its kind, shows promise for using nostalgic messages to promote pro-social behaviors," Lapinski said. "We know that policy and environmental changes have an influence on smoking and this study indicates persuasive messages can influence smoking attitudes." (ANI)

Region: IndiaGeneral: Health

Your left or right handedness was decided when you were a foetus!

Health News - Sun, 02/19/2017 - 04:29

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. : Lefty or righty? Well it was decided when you were still in your mum's womb!

A preference for the left or the right hand might be traced back to asymmetry. These results fundamentally change our understanding of the cause of hemispheric asymmetries.

The study was published in the journal eLife.

To date, it had been assumed that differences in gene activity of the right and left hemisphere might be responsible for a person's handedness. A preference for moving the left or right hand develops in the womb from the eighth week of pregnancy, according to ultrasound scans carried out in the 1980s. From the 13th week of pregnancy, unborn children prefer to suck either their right or their left thumb.

Arm and hand movements are initiated via the motor cortex in the brain. It sends a corresponding signal to the spinal cord, which in turn translates the command into a motion. The motor cortex, however, is not connected to the spinal cord from the beginning. Even before the connection forms, precursors of handedness become apparent. This is why the researchers have assumed that the cause of right respective left preference must be rooted in the spinal cord rather than in the brain.

The researchers analysed the gene expression in the spinal cord during the eighth to twelfth week of pregnancy and detected marked right-left differences in the eighth week -- in precisely those spinal cord segments that control the movements of arms and legs. Another study had shown that unborn children carry out asymmetric hand movements just as early as that.

The researchers, moreover, traced the cause of asymmetric gene activity. Epigenetic factors appear to be at the root of it, reflecting environmental influences. Those influences might, for example, lead to enzymes bonding methyl groups to the DNA, which in turn would affect and minimise the reading of genes. As this occurs to a different extent in the left and the right spinal cord, there is a difference to the activity of genes on both sides. (ANI)

Region: New DelhiIndiaGeneral: Health

Too many 'beg your pardon's' in a day? You might have hidden hearing impairment

Health News - Sun, 02/19/2017 - 04:22

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. : Do you find it difficult hearing out people at a noisy bar or a restaurant even though you have passed the hearing test with flying colors? Well, you might be secretly deaf!

Now, less than six years since its initial description, scientists have made great strides in understanding what hidden hearing loss is and what causes it. In research published in Nature Communications, University of Michigan researchers report a new unexpected cause for this auditory neuropathy, a step toward the eventual work to identify treatments.

"If people can have hidden hearing loss for different reasons, having the ability to make the right diagnosis of the pathogenesis will be critical," says author Gabriel Corfas, Ph.D., director of the Kresge Hearing Research Institute at Michigan Medicine's Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery.

Corfas published the research with co-author Guoqiang Wan, now with Nanjing University in China. They discovered using mice that disruption in the Schwann cells that make myelin, which insulates the neuronal axons in the ear, leads to hidden hearing loss. This means hidden hearing loss could be behind auditory deficits seen in acute demyelinating disorders such as Guillain-Barre syndrome, which can be caused by Zika virus.

Corfas and Wan used genetic tools to induce loss of myelin in the auditory nerve of mice, modeling Guillain-Barre. Although the myelin regenerated in a few weeks, the mice developed a permanent hidden hearing loss. Even after the myelin regenerated, damage to a nerve structure called the heminode remained.

Synapse loss versus myelin disruption

When the ear is exposed to loud noises over time, synapses connecting hair cells with the neurons in the inner ear are lost. This loss of synapses has previously been shown as a mechanism leading to hidden hearing loss.

In an audiologist's quiet testing room, only a few synapses are needed to pick up sounds. But in a noisy environment, the ear must activate specific synapses. If they aren't all there, it's difficult for people to make sense of the noise or words around them. That is hidden hearing loss, Corfas says.

"Exposure to noise is increasing in our society, and children are exposing themselves to high levels of noise very early in life," Corfas says. "It's clear that being exposed to high levels of sound might contribute to increases in hidden hearing loss."

The newly identified cause -- deficiency in Schwann cells -- could occur in individuals who have already had noise exposure-driven hidden hearing loss as well. "Both forms of hidden hearing loss, noise exposure and loss of myelin, can occur in the same individual for an additive effect," Corfas says.

Previously, Corfas' group succeeded in regenerating synapses in mice with hidden hearing loss, providing a path to explore for potential treatment.

While continuing this work, Corfas started to investigate other cells in the ear, which led to uncovering the new mechanism.

There are no current treatments for hidden hearing loss. But as understanding of the condition improves, the goal is for the research to lead to the development of drugs to treat it.

"Our findings should influence the way hidden hearing loss is diagnosed and drive the future of clinical trials searching for a treatment," Corfas says. "The first step is to know whether a person's hidden hearing loss is due to synapse loss or myelin/heminode damage."(ANI)

Region: IndiaGeneral: Health

GM reportedly planning to build & test thousands of self-driving cars

UAE News - Sat, 02/18/2017 - 09:46

American automobile giant General Motors Co. (GM) is reportedly preparing to deploy thousands of self-driving e-cars in test fleets in collaboration with ride-sharing affiliate Lyft Inc., starting next year.

Multiple anonymous sources familiar with GM's plans revealed the automaker has plans to allow Lyft to test thousands of specially equipped versions of its Chevrolet Bolt e-cars in various states in the U. S.

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Categories: UAE News

What the! Clean drinking water can cause asthma

Health News - Sat, 02/18/2017 - 05:29

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 : Clean drinking water for everyone is one major health goal for decades, in one a shocking revelation, a study warns that while it reduces chances of catching many deadly diseases, but it can increase the risk of childhood asthma.

Researchers from the University of British Columbia in Canada suggested that there could be a link between the risk of asthma and the cleanliness of the environment.

The findings indicated that while gut bacteria plays a role in preventing asthma, but it was the presence of a microscopic fungus or yeast known as Pichia that was more strongly linked to asthma. Instead of helping to prevent asthma, however, the presence of Pichia in those early days puts children at risk.

"Children with this type of yeast called Pichia were much more at risk of asthma," said Brett Finlay.

"That was a surprise because we tend to think that clean is good, but we realise that we actually need some dirt in the world to help protect you," Finlay added.

The new research furthers our understanding of the role microscopic organisms play in our overall health.

In previous research, Finlay and his colleagues identified four gut bacteria in children and if present in the first 100 days of life, seem to prevent asthma.

In a follow-up to this study, they repeated the experiment using fecal samples and health information from 100 children in a rural village in Ecuador.

As part of the study, the researchers noted whether children had access to clean water.

They found a yeast in the gut of new babies in Ecuador that appears to be a strong predictor that they will develop asthma in childhood.

They also found the presence of four types of bacteria in the gut of babies less than 100 days old seemed to prevent them from developing asthma in later life.

"Those that had access to good, clean water had much higher asthma rates and we think it is because they were deprived of the beneficial microbes," Finlay stated. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Now, antibiotics can become alternative to surgery for appendicitis

Health News - Sat, 02/18/2017 - 04:52

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 : Now you can save your kid from surgery, as a study shows that antibiotics may be an effective treatment for acute non-complicated appendicitis in children, instead of surgery.

Appendicitis is a serious medical condition in which the appendix becomes inflamed and causes severe pain.

The appeared in the journal of Pediatrics

The condition, which causes the appendix -- a small organ attached to the large intestine -- to become inflamed due to a blockage or infection, affects mainly children and teenagers.

Appendicitis is currently treated through an operation to remove the appendix, known as an appendicectomy, and it is the most common cause of emergency surgery in children.

The study, led by Nigel Hall from the University of Southampton in England, assessed existing literature published over the past 10 years that included 10 studies reporting on 413 children, who received non-operative treatment rather than an appendectomy.

It showed that no study reported any safety concern or specific adverse events related to non-surgical treatment, although the rate of recurrent appendicitis was 14 percent.

"Our review shows that antibiotics could be an alternative treatment method for children. When we compared the adult literature to the data in our review it suggested that antibiotic treatment of acute appendicitis is at least as effective in children as in adults,"

To further this research, the scientists are currently carrying out a year-long feasibility trial which will see children with appendicitis randomly allocated to have either surgery or antibiotic treatment.

"In our initial trial, we will see how many patients and families are willing to join the study and will look at how well children in the study recover. This will give us an indication of how many children we may be able to recruit into a future larger trial and how the outcomes of non-operative treatment compare with an operation," Hall stated. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Sing lullabies to your newborn to feel the connection

Health News - Sat, 02/18/2017 - 04:38

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 : Attention new mommies, sing lullabies to your new born to feel more connected to your babies, suggests a study.

The research, published in the Journal of Music Therapy, finds that through song, the infants are provided with much-needed sensory stimulation that can focus their attention and modulate their arousal.

"One of the main goals of the research was to clarify the meaning of infant-directed singing as a human behaviour and as a means to elicit unique behavioural responses from infants," said study author Shannon de l'Etoile from the University of Miami in the US.

The researchers also explored the role of infant-directed singing in relation to intricate bond between mother and infant.

They filmed 70 infants and observed their responses to six different interactions: mother sings an assigned song, "stranger" sings an assigned song, mother sings song of choice, mother reads book, mother plays with toy and the mother and infant listen to recorded music.

The findings suggested that high cognitive scores during infant-directed singing suggested that engagement through song is just as effective as book reading or toy play in maintaining infant attention and far more effective than listening to recorded music.

The results also revealed that when infants were engaged during song, their mother's instincts are also on high alert and when infant engagement declined the mother adjusted her pitch, tempo or key to stimulate and regulate infant response.

For mothers with postpartum depression, infant-directed singing creates a unique and mutually beneficial situation," de l'Etoile noted.

"Simultaneously, mothers experience a much-needed distraction from the negative emotions and thoughts associated with depression, while also feeling empowered as a parent," de l'Etoile explained. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Snap files updated IPO paperwork with SEC

UAE News - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 09:32

Snap Inc. on Thursday filed updated paperwork with the U. S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) detailing its eagerly-awaited initial public offering (IPO).

According to the social media company's SEC filing, it will sell up to 230 million shares with price tag range between $14 and $16 per share. That would generate up to $3.6 billion for the company.

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Categories: UAE News

Study shows links between physical attractiveness and higher salaries

Health News - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 05:06

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 : As a saying, "beauty is skin deep" sounds fair, but in the real world where money is top priority, physical attractiveness might have a lot more prominence than just inner beauty.

A study finds that healthier, more intelligent people have superior personality traits are preferred more for taking fatter pay checks home than those who are aesthetically compromised.

The study appeared in Springer's Journal of Business and Psychology.

The findings indicated that population-based surveys showed that people who are physically attractive earn more than the average Joe or Jane, while those who are aesthetically compromised - that gives pleasure through beauty - earn less.

More attractive lawyers and MBA graduates are also said to earn more.

Researchers, Satoshi Kanazawa of the London School of Economics and Mary Still of the University of Massachusetts in Boston analysed a nationally representative sample from a US data set that had very precise and repeated measures of physical attractiveness.

It measured physical attractiveness of all respondents on a five-point scale at four different points in life over 13 years.

Their analysis showed that people are not necessarily discriminated against because of their looks. The beauty premium theory was dispelled when the researchers took into account factors such as health, intelligence and major personality factors together with other correlates of physical attractiveness.

Healthier and more intelligent respondents and those with more conscientious, more extraverted and less Neurotic personality traits earned significantly more than others.

"Physically more attractive workers may earn more, not necessarily because they are more beautiful, but because they are healthier, more intelligent and have better personality traits conducive to higher earnings, such as being more conscientious, more extraverted and less Neurotic," Kanazawa explained.

Still stated that the methods used in other studies might explain why the findings in the current research are contrary to many current thoughts about the economics of beauty. (ANI)

Region: WashingtonGeneral: Health

Consume Vitamin D pills to cut winter colds and flu

Health News - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 04:45

London [UK], Feb. 17 : Consume a healthy dose of vitamin D supplements during winters, as a study finds that taking them may protect you from acute respiratory infections and flu.

The study, published in The BMJ, suggests that taking vitamin D - also known as the sunshine vitamin - may have benefits beyond bone and muscle health and protects against acute respiratory infections.

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London found that vitamin D supplementation cut the proportion of participants experiencing at least one acute respiratory tract infection by 12 percent, reports the Mirror.

"The bottom line is that the protective effects of vitamin D supplementation are strongest in those who have the lowest vitamin D levels and when supplementation is given daily or weekly rather than in more widely spaced doses," said lead researcher Adrian Martineau.

Respiratory tract infections are infection of the sinuses, throat, airways or lungs and can last up to 30 days.

They analyzed the data from almost 11,000 participants aged up to 95, who took part in 25 clinical trials.

The findings indicated that that supplements can help to prevent acute respiratory tract infections, particularly among those who are deficient in vitamin D.

After adjusting for other potentially influential factors, the team found that vitamin D supplementation cut the proportion of the participants experiencing at least one acute respiratory tract infection by 1 percent.

The results fit with the observation that colds and flu are most common during winter and spring, when levels of vitamin D are at their lowest.

"The evidence on vitamin D and infection is inconsistent and this study does not provide sufficient evidence to support recommending vitamin D for reducing the risk of respiratory tract infections," Martineau explained. (ANI)

Region: LondonGeneral: Health

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The health of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is in... Read More