Pollen Season Starts a Month Early

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Pollen Season Starts a Month Early

Winter being unseasonably warm this year, pollen allergy victims are the one who suffer badly. This year, the allergy season started in the month of February, a month earlier than last year when it was snowy winter.

Dr. Ross Chang, President of the B. C. Society of Allergy and Immunology said, "This is about as early as we get it. It's probably going to be another bad season".

In the month of April, the airborne pollen from Alder and Birch, Elm and Poplar will continue to cause menace with allergy sufferers in the month of April, by grass pollen in August.

About 30% of the population is affected, and people are already exhibiting symptoms like runny noses, itchy eyes, and sneezing, congestion etc. Half of the afflicted people are prescribed medicines.

Pollen counts were recorded by a team at Genoa University to know the possible time duration of pollen seasons and sensitivity to five kinds of pollen in Bordighera region of Italy from the year 1981 to 2007.

Dr. Walter Canonica, who worked on the study stated, "By studying a well-defined geographical region, we observed that the progressive increase of the average temperature has prolonged the duration of the pollen seasons of some plants and, consequently, the overall pollen load".

Yet it can't be stated that longer pollen seasons put more people at risk for developing such allergies.


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