Heavy Dosage of Vitamin D Might Help Ward Off Skin Cancer

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Heavy Dosage of Vitamin D Might Help Ward Off Skin Cancer

Recent researches at Henry Ford and Wayne State University have thrown light on relation between Vitamin D levels and basal cell carcinoma.

Dr. Lappe, a Professor at Creighton University in Nebraska, and the Lead Researcher says the study will entail 2,300 postmenopausal women. They will be observed for four years to see if the vitamin reduces cancer rates, along with the incidence of heart disease and diabetes.

Another study, in which 20,000 people will be involved, will check if fish oils are good for heart health and stroke prevention. It is scheduled to go on for almost seven years.

U. S. National Institutes of Health are sponsoring both studies.

Studies have also found that people living at northern latitudes are more prone to cancer, diabetes, and other chronic ailments, compared with those who living further south.

The concept that vitamin deficiency might lead to cancer and many other illnesses has given way to debates among medical research community. Physicians are of the belief that effectiveness and probable side effects should be ascertained before people start taking them in bulk.


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