Nokia Rebuked for Selling Spy Equipment to Iran

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Nokia Rebuked for Selling Spy Equipment to Iran

Complete electronic surveillance equipment has been sold to Iran by the Nokia Siemens Network Group, which is believed to be competent of spying on almost all electronic communications.

According to Jukka Manner, Professor of Data Network Technology at the Aalto University, "The system can monitor all voice and data communications very efficiently. In addition, it can snatch messages with content considered suspicious".

Manner says that the system is able to monitor internet communications in addition to text and multimedia messaging, mobile and landline telephone calls, instant messages, e-mail communications, telefax communications, data transfer over the mobile network and mobile telephone positioning.

Helsingin Sanomat reports that Nokia Siemens said that the electronic surveillance system sold to Iran was a trial version and did not have the ability for internet surveillance. Meanwhile, Lauri Kivinen, Nokia Siemens Networks Head of Corporate Affairs, has been rebuked for not being truthful about his company's businesses. He however said that there was a misperception about the Iran deal.


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