Cahill Criticizes Health Care Law

.

Cahill Criticizes Health Care Law

State Treasurer Timothy P. Cahill, an independent candidate for Governor, posted yesterday that the state's universal health care law is causing bankruptcy in Massachusetts, extending concerns the same could be spread nationally if Congress passes a similar plan.

"If President Obama and the Democrats repeat the mistake of the health insurance reform here in Massachusetts on a national level, they will threaten to wipe out the American economy within four years'', Cahill quotes at a press conference.

With Baker shielding the state's health care plan, Cahill's clearly reveals that how the treasurer, despite his longtime membership in the Democratic Party, may seek to run to the right of Baker as all three candidates jockey for voter support this year.

Cahill's severe criticism clearly reverberated that leveled by Senator Scott Brown over his run for US Senate and by congressional Republicans trying to inhibit Obama's plan.

Numerous policy makers and candidates, including Patrick, are revealed to have acknowledged that while the state law has extended its sphere to about 97 percent of residents; however, it has not reduced insurance premiums, which have continued to rise sharply.

"Independent analysis has shown that health reform in the Commonwealth has added about 1 percent to the state budget'', Patrick told reporters.


Latest News

Fourth Quarter Loss Posted by Walgreen
Steve Wynn, Casino Magnate Says Gambling Industry is not about Slot Machines
News Corp. to Buy Move Inc. for $950 million
Will PayPal soon Look for Mergers with Mobile Payment Services to fight Competit
Ford Shares Drop With Profit Concerns
Dominion LNG Export Project Gets Green Signal from FERC
Second Quarter Shows Fastest Growth of U.S Economy
Stronger Safeguarding Rules for Service Members Against Predatory Lenders
Yahoo Urged to Buy Rival AOL Inc.
Slowing Down of Inflation May Make it Difficult for BOJ to Achieve its Target
B.K. Modi’s CIO Plans to Start Pre-IPO Fund
American Soda makers Promise to Trim Twenty Percent Calories by 2025