Blackcurrants Tend to Help Asthma Patients, Study Says

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Blackcurrants Tend to Help Asthma Patients, Study Says

A recent study undertaken by a team of scientists in New Zealand has revealed that asthma patients could get substantial help from blackcurrants.

The team has managed to isolate a compound in the fruit which has the capability to help the lungs fight inflammation that is a result of asthma.

Blackcurrants have high vitamin and antioxidants content and are also one of life's "super-foods", most commonly used as an ingredient in juices, teas and jam.

One particular compound in the fruit, however, is a strong anti-inflammatory agent known as epigallocatechin, which is bound to offer hope to New Zealanders suffering from asthma, which estimates say is a condition which affects
1 in 5 Kiwis.

As has been shared by a Planet and Food Research spokesperson, Dr. Roger Hurst, epigallocatechin tends to completely control the inflammation caused.

"It brings the inflammation to an appropriate level so that the cells are behaving normally again, which is quite amazing to us. The effect blackcurrant has two parts - it can control the unregulated inflammation, it also assists the body's natural abilities to fight that inflammation as well, so it's a two-pronged benefit", he said.

Details of the study have been published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research.


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