Medicated Bath Products Increasing Water Pollution

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Medicated Bath Products Increasing Water Pollution

A study revealed at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society that medicated bath and laundering products are leading to increased water pollution.

Researchers stated that these products are a leading source of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), which is of concern to environmentalists.

Earlier it was believed that the active ingredients from medicines gain entry in the environment mainly through human waste, urine and feces. This is for the very first time that bath products have been believed to be the cause of increasing levels of pollution.

Dr. Ilene Ruhoy remarked that the onus for heightened levels of API’s in ground water can be placed on the use of lotions, creams, gels and skin patches.

To cut the level of API’s Ruhoy suggested that doctors should prescribe patients with drugs that contain lower amounts of API’s. She also recommended that consumers should use their medicated products with care and frugally.

She also remarked, "We need to be more aware of how our use of pharmaceuticals can have unwanted environmental effects".

The identification of the major sources of APIs is an important step in minimizing their ecological impact according to Ruhoy.

 


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