Soy Link to Reduce Cholesterol After Menopause Declared False

.

Soy Link to Reduce Cholesterol After Menopause Declared False

A new study has suggested that adopting a soy-rich diet for one year doesn't assist in the lowering of the blood cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women, despite the general belief.

The findings support the Food and Drug Administration's 2007 report to conduct a re-evaluation of its decade-old approval permitting soy product makers to claim heart benefits, Dr. Sara Chelland Campbell of Florida State University in Tallahassee and her colleagues reveal.

Previous studies had uncovered that isoflavones present in soy products have estrogen-like action and hence can resist the rise in total cholesterol and LDL levels commonly reported in postmenopausal women.

The new study published in Menopause reveals that consuming extra soy for one year poses no effect on the blood levels of LDL (bad cholesterol) or triglyceride in postmenopausal women.

However, its consumption is linked with a small increase in the total cholesterol and good HDL levels, the study discovered.

Among the controlled group women enrolled for the study, average total cholesterol was reported to rise to 254 mg/dL after a year, compared to about 243 mg/dL for the soy group. HDL levels jumped from 58 mg/dL to 63 mg/dL in the control group, and from 57 mg/dL to 60 mg/dL in the soy group.


Latest News

Greece’s Interior Minister Says Greece will not be Able to Repay Debt Next Month
Nikos Voutsis, Greece’s Interior Minister
Rig Count in U.S Slows, Oil Trades Close to $60
Third Annual ‘March against Monsanto’ held on Saturday
In Response to Tuesday’s Oil Spill, Governor Jerry Brown
Ruptured Oil Pipeline Leads to 21,000 gallons of Oil Flowing into California Coa
Janet Yellen Awarded her Second Yale Degree
Japan’s Improved First-Quarter GDP Portrays a Recovering Economy
A Plane of Hawaiian Airlines Bound for Honolulu Made Emergency Landing in LAX af
U.S Supreme Court Ruling Says Employers Must Monitor Fees for 401(k) Accounts
Starbucks to Partner with Stopify for Music Streaming Services
Kering Sues Alibaba in the U.S Court for Selling Counterfeit Goods