Less Sleep Leads to More Calories Intake

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Less Sleep

According to a new study, the people who desire to stay sleek and slim should try to get as much as sleep possible.

The research concludes that normal – weight men tend to consume more of calories if they do not get an adequate sleep of eight hours.

It has been observed that more of the people are suffering from obesity as they are taking less of sleep and sleep disorders and restrictions have been considered one of the environmental factors which disturb the consumption capacity of the body.

Prior to the recent study, some other researchers have also associated the sleeping period with the body mass index, which has the potential to go higher if the adequate sleep pattern is disturbed. Body mass index is a measure which helps in the study of obese persons but as far as checking the pattern of eating habits in a normal-weight person is concerned, no such extra efforts have been made so far.

In order to observe, Dr. Laurent Brondel of the European Center for Taste Sciences, took the initiative by monitoring the expenditure pattern of 12 young men on sleep, food and energy.

The selected study participants were assessed and it was concluded that men happen to take 22% more calories on an average in comparison to the period in which they were made to sleep for eight hours. Increase in the average calorie intake was 560.


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