Gene Mutation Poses Threat of Cardiac Arrest in People with Epilepsy

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Gene Mutation Poses Threat of Cardiac Arrest in People with Epilepsy

A new research has disclosed that people suffering from epilepsy, are an easy target of death and uneven heart beat due to a potential gene mutation which takes place in the brain.

The report offer reasons as to why people suffering with epilepsy are more vulnerable to death than the common population. It is of belief that people with epilepsy are more strong and healthy than their counterparts.

The aim of the research is to check and recognize the people who are posed with greater threat of cardiac arrest and to chalk out the best possible cure.

Jeffrey Noebels of the Baylor College of Medicine and his colleagues stressed on the study of the abnormal ion channels which leads to epilepsy and it also has the tendency to put the patient through an unexplained death. It was also discovered by them that the ion channel is very much necessary for the sound functioning of the heat.

The study declares that if mice lack the ion channels, it could lead to severe epilepsy in them.

Edward Glasscock, first author of the study said, "In mice without Kv1.1 channels, we think the vagus nerve loses control and sends extra nerve impulses to the heart, telling it to slow down -- and even stop beating -- when it shouldn't".


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