Wash. Sheriff's Deputy files Lawsuit against Burger King Over a Whopper with Spit

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Wash. Sheriff's Deputy files Lawsuit against Burger King Over a Whopper with Spi

According to reports, a Sheriff's Deputy in Washington State is filing a lawsuit against Burger King and a franchise worker over a hamburger that he claims a worker had spit on.

In the lawsuit, Clark County Sheriff's Deputy, Edward Bylsma says that he stopped for a snack at a Vancouver, Wash., Burger King early morning in March 2009. He got an "uneasy feeling" about two of its employees.

The suit says that when he checked his hamburger, he discovered a large clump of spit. The DNA testing matched with the saliva of one of the employees, who ultimately appealed guilty to third-degree attack against an officer.

The suit filed in the federal court suit on Tuesday in Portland asks for at least $75,000 and names Burger King Corp. and franchise operator, Kaizen Restaurants in Beaverton.

On Wednesday, Burger King and Kaizen said in a statement that they have "zero tolerance" for the workers' deeds, and that both workers have been sacked.

Meanwhile, Bylsma's Attorney, Anne Bremner of Seattle, said, "There's been no assurance after the fact that they've changed anything. We haven't gotten anything — not even an apology".

The eight-page complaint affirms that Bylsma received the dirty burger at the drive-through restaurant at 5513 N. E. Gher Road on March 24, 2009.


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