F.C.C Adamant on Continuing With National Broadband Plan Despite Ruling

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F.C.C Adamant on Continuing With National Broadband Plan Despite Ruling

It has been revealed that the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission told a Congressional panel on Wednesday, the Agency will carry out its plan to the agency will continue with its plans to broadly expand the country’s high speed internet service. It will continue with its plans despite a court ruling that the agency does not have any power to regulate the internet.

However, the Chairman refused to delineate if the commission would reclassify Internet service, like a service that is can be parallel to telephone service in order to override the decision of the court.

This move gathered some support from Democratic senators but elicited cautionary warning from several Republican senators.

Julius Genachowski, the F. C. C. Chairman, issued a testimony to the Senate Commerce Committee, stating that the agency’s lawyers still figuring out the repercussions of the court case, Comcast v. F. C. C. about the National Broadband Plan.

According to reports, the broadband plan attempts to provide countrywide espousal of high-speed Internet service, superior accessibility to high-speed connections for wireless devices and subsidies for rural broadband service.

Mr. Genachowski said, “I have instructed our lawyers to take the recent decision seriously and evaluate what our options are”.

 


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