Health Doctors Support Calls to Ban Trans-fat in UK Food

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Health Doctors Support Calls to Ban Trans-fat in UK Food

It has been reported that two leading health doctors have supported calls to ban trans-fats from all food products in Britain.

The US doctors, in an editorial in the British Medical Journal, said in England alone, the ban would avert about 11,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths.

The UK Faculty of Public Health, in January 2010 said the consumption of trans-fats should be practically removed.

The Harvard Medical School backed this and said, bans in New York City and Denmark had successfully got rid of trans-fats, without plummeting food availability, affordability or taste.

Trans-fat is said to be used to expand shelf-life but have no dietetic value and, they also lead to increase in blood cholesterol levels which raise the danger of coronary heart disease.

Professor Alan Maryon-Davis, President of the Faculty of Public Health, stated, "There are great differences in the amount of trans-fats consumed by different people and we are particularly concerned about young people and those with little disposable income who eat a lot of this type of food”.

The Food Standards Agency carried out a review of trans-fats in the year 2007, and resulted that consumption was lesser in Britain than other countries.

According to, Senior Heart Health Dietician at the British Heart Foundation, Victoria Taylor, UK voluntary measures by the food industry had attained significant lessening in the quantity of trans-fats in food.


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