University of Maryland Students Go ‘24 Hours Unplugged’

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University of Maryland Students Go ‘24 Hours Unplugged’

200 students from the University of Maryland were challenged to stay away from social media for 24 hours.

The students were asked to abstain from all cell phones, text messages, laptops or netbooks, chatting or Twitter, e-mail and Facebook. The intention was a complete return to simplicity.

The study of these students revealed that the entire experience was very traumatic for them. The manner, in which these students behaved, was akin to that of drug addicts. It was seen that most students exhibited withdrawal symptoms like those shown by alcoholics or drug users when they try to quit.

A report released by the University revealed that some descriptions of the students showed themselves over and over again. The release stated the students were, "In withdrawal. Frantically craving. Very anxious. Extremely antsy. Miserable. Jittery. Crazy".

The study was called 24 Hours Unplugged. It was undertaken by the University's International Center for Media & the Public Agenda in late February and early March. The study found that American college students find it difficult to work without their media connection to the world.


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