University of Maryland Students Go ‘24 Hours Unplugged’

.

University of Maryland Students Go ‘24 Hours Unplugged’

200 students from the University of Maryland were challenged to stay away from social media for 24 hours.

The students were asked to abstain from all cell phones, text messages, laptops or netbooks, chatting or Twitter, e-mail and Facebook. The intention was a complete return to simplicity.

The study of these students revealed that the entire experience was very traumatic for them. The manner, in which these students behaved, was akin to that of drug addicts. It was seen that most students exhibited withdrawal symptoms like those shown by alcoholics or drug users when they try to quit.

A report released by the University revealed that some descriptions of the students showed themselves over and over again. The release stated the students were, "In withdrawal. Frantically craving. Very anxious. Extremely antsy. Miserable. Jittery. Crazy".

The study was called 24 Hours Unplugged. It was undertaken by the University's International Center for Media & the Public Agenda in late February and early March. The study found that American college students find it difficult to work without their media connection to the world.


Latest News

Worshipers lose church after decades of fight
Criticism after rare gorilla is killed to save child in Cincinnati Zoo
Noble Group Announced Its Chief Executive Yusuf Alireza is Resigning due to “Fam
Puerto Rico Gets Some Relief with Rescue Bill and Demand and Improving Agricultu
PageProof Learnt from the U.S Market, Language is Important!
James Bullard St. Louis Federal Reserve President says Global Markets Appear to
Memorial Day Sales Kicks Off with Retailers Offering Big Discounts
Coca Cola to Roll Out Limited Edition “Proud to be an American’ Cans this Weeken
Groups clash at Trump event in San Diego
Missouri declares emergency over heavy rains
U.S. Labor Secretary Announced Verizon and Unions have Reach an “Agreement in Pr
Different Reports Suggest Jawbone Might be in Trouble