New Ways to Fight Dengue Fever

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New Ways to Fight Dengue Fever

It has been seen that new clues have been found by the researchers on how the body fights against dengue fever. This research would be helpful for making a vaccine that would be able to fight the disease.

This research was published in Science, and explained that people who recover from the virus may have worse symptoms if they caught the disease again.

This disease was a viral infection that was spread with a mosquito bite. It has been seen that it was the major cause of illness and cases of these disease were increasing.

Blood samples were taken from the infected volunteers by the researchers who were from UK and Thailand.

"Our new research gives us some key information about what is and what is not likely to work when trying to combat the dengue virus. We hope that our findings will bring scientists one step closer to creating an effective vaccine", said Professor Gavin Screaton, Head of the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London.

According to Professor Screaton, the main major challenge for them was to develop a vaccine that had four different strains. He also mentioned that the challenge was to kill four bugs at once with a single needle.


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