Autistic Kids Get Distracted with Shadows

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Autistic Kids Get Distracted with Shadows

A novel research by researchers in Italy has showed that children suffering from autism see shadows in different way than the way their peers do.

Umberto Castiello, a Neuropsychologist at the University of Padua in Italy, and contemporaries established that whilst people can look at the shadow of a thing and often understand what the thing is, shadows get in the way with how autistic kids identify objects.

The new findings throw a light on the sensory oddities that come along with and probably even assist in causing autism.

The researchers illustrated 20 high-functioning kids suffering from autism and 20 typical kids computerized adaptations of well-known objects with identifiable shapes, for example apples, bananas, forks or knives.

While the experiments were conducted, the presence, shape and location of the shadows the objects shed were methodically controlled, for example, an urn might shed the expected shadow, the shadow of a funnel, or no shadow at all.

A probable clarification is that in autism, shadows go from being uncomplicated things worth a look to extra details they hyper-focus on, potentially consuming their concentration.

During the evaluation, a few kids needed snacks, which means, kids with autism have certain patterns of eating that shouldn't be violated.


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