Research: Short Sessions of Exercise Reduce Stress Effect

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Research: Short Sessions of Exercise Reduce Stress Effect

A new research reveals that short sessions of exercise can help in keeping stress at low levels on cell aging, which is a very helpful method in keeping stress at bay.

As per findings published online in the May 26 issue of PLoS ONE, vigorous physical exercise amounting to as minute as 14 minutes every day, three day for each week, would be sufficient to bring in that protective effect.

The plain advantage is reflected from exercise's effect on the span of tiny pieces of DNA that is known as telomeres. These telomeres function, effectively, such as molecular shoelace tips that grasp the whole thing collectively, so as to keep genes and chromosomes stable.

Researchers consider that telomeres are inclined to cut down over time in response to pressure, leading to an increasing risk for heart disease, diabetes and even casualty. However, exercise, it appears might sluggish down or, even bring an end to this shortening procedure.

Appreciation for how telomeres work and how stress may have its effect on their length stems from preceding Nobel-prize winning work that was carried out by UCSF researchers.

Previous studies have also recommended that doing exercise is in a number of ways associated with longer telomere length.


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