DNR Has Improved Its Way of Informing Public Regarding E. coli Outbreak in Lakes

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On this weekend, the “E. coli Controversy” turned one and the approach toward informing public also improved. Last year, where it took Missouri a month approximately to inform public regarding unacceptably high levels of E. coli in Lake of the Ozarks last week, on the contrary, state employees within two hours and 17 minutes issued warning regarding high levels of bacteria at three beaches.

The positive change is surely apparent.

The Department of Natural Resources has renovated its way of intimating public about the harmful readings of E. coli. Government says that such high levels of these bacteria can cause serious health hazard.

The Department has also appointed a task force, in order to examine the centralized sewer district near the lake, as it has been known that thousands of septic tanks overflow into the water there.

But, Gov. Jay Nixon’s plans of cleaning the lake and implementing some bills for solving the lake’s problems did not live up to the hope.

However, the DNR’s overhaul deserves praise but much more is yet to be done. Even Scott Dye, the Director of the Sierra Club’s Water Sentinels program admits the same.

Dye said that the E. coli scandal is a bigger problem and that “everybody who lives and recreates or has a business at the lake” should find some permanent solution to the problem together.

It has been informed by DNR that E, coli have not gone away completely and people need to be cautious.


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