Jobs Says Adobe's Flash is "Waning" and "Had its Day"


Jobs Says Adobe's Flash is "Waning" and "Had its Day"

Lately, it was stated by Apple CEO, Steve Jobs that Adobe's Flash is "waning" and "had its day".

Speaking at the D: All Things Digital conference in Rancho Pales Verdes, Calif., on Tuesday night, Jobs stated, "Sometimes you have to pick the things that look like the right horses to ride going forward".

He said that lash looks like a technology that had its day and is waning, while HTML 5 appears like the technology that is actually on the superiority at present.

Jobs added by saying that they did not begin to have a war with Flash. All they did was just made a technical decision.

His closing argument was convincing. He said that if the market tells them that they're making the wrong decisions, then they do listen to the market and also try their best to make the finest products. And if they thrive, customers buy the products but if they don't, the customers don't.

He said that, till now it was seen that people have liked the iPads and ever since the launch, one every three seconds have been sold.

However, it has been reported that Jobs might succeed over others if users begin to miss Flash less and less. And that may perhaps happen.

Latest News

NextEra Agrees to Sell Two Texas Power Plants to Luminant
China’s Yuan Could be Named a Reserve Currency by the IMF
Rupert Murdoch Tweets Tribune Probably Selling Los Angeles Times
Black Friday Shopping “Uninspiring” in Brick and Mortar Stores; Shopping Trends
U.S. Crude Drops Further Due to Surplus Supply
CVC and CPPIB Outbid Others for a Possible Deal to Buy Petco for $4.7 Billion
US Government All Set to Introduce a New Law for Americans “Seriously Delinquent
Reportedly Pfizer Plans to Acquire Allergan in a Deal of $150 Billion or More
In October Most States Experienced a Drop in Unemployment Rate
San Francisco Fed President John Williams sees a “Strong Case” for an Interest
Cincinnati Shoppers have More Choice of Local Black Friday Deals this Year
Sliding Crude Prices Continue Giving the U.S Oil Producers Reasons to Cut Costs