Disastrous 'Star Wars Lightsaber' Shipped to UK

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Disastrous 'Star Wars Lightsaber' Shipped to UK

A handheld laser likened to a Star Wars lightsabre is reported to have initiated retailing online and shipped to the UK.

The device features a beam, which is revealed to be 1,000 times powerful than sunlight on the skin, is boosted by its manufacturers as "the most dangerous laser ever created".

It radiates a 445nm blue, high powered 1W beam which possess 4000% brightness compared to Sonar's 405nm beam, posts Wicked Lasers on its product page.

In addition, the site claims that the device features very high burning capabilities among any portable laser present.

However, trading standards Chiefs have posted their serious concern concerning the sale of the Spyder III Pro Arctic model and have cautioned against its use.

Star Wars fans are regarded among hundreds of people who have already come forward with their shear interest in purchasing the laser, for sale to the general public for £135.

Laser safety expert John Colton, Director of Lucid Optical Services, quoted Sky News Online, "Under no circumstances should they be on sale on the internet”.

The designing of the device would have been a lot costlier, if technological advancements would have not been present to assist the whole process.


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