'spice' On a High as Alternative to Marijuana

.

'spice' On a High as Alternative to Marijuana

In the small room of Capitol Hemp, a small shop in Adams Morgan, a worker works for making arrangements for a string of ceramic pipes packed in a well-lit glass case.

The back of the counter features another shop with a large storage capacity who is witnessing its popularity on new highs every day: "spice," the generic name for legal "synthetic marijuana."

Capitol Hemp owner Adam Eidinger has claimed that the recent 18 months, since when he initiated storing spice, demand has registered a rise to a double level each month. Also, its sales have managed to touch a level that accounts for a nearly 33% of his revenue.

On some Fridays, he posted, his two District stores can account to $10,000 alone, from the sales of spice.

Buying and selling of spices is legalized in the District and majority of the states across the country. Usually, spice crushed green leaves are applied with various man-made chemicals. When smoked, the treated leaves produce a marijuana-like high.

However, witnessing the soaring rate of its use, questions related to its safety have triggered questions. Lawmakers in a majority of states have initiated to launch stern actions.

"We have never had any complaints or concerns from customers", Eidinger quoted."We always ask the manufacturers if there is anything illegal in the products. We only use the products we trust, and if it is made illegal in D. C., we will stop selling it".

 


Latest News

U.S. Economic Growth Gets a Boost with New Home Building
Tesla May not Get an Opportunity to Open Stores in Michigan
Cuban role applauded by Kerry in Ebola fight
Travel restrictions can be caused by rising polio cases
Unprotected sex increases in final year of college
Amid Ebola fears in US, newspaper chooses to focus on India's 'health crisis'
Report Given by Nuclear Regulatory says Closure Plan of Yucca Mountain Meets Saf
Google’s Slowing Clicks on Ads Worry Investors and Analysts
Video games can actually help
Aussie’s chest burrowed by Bali spider
No reduction in atrial fibrillation with fish oil, new research finds
Existing protocols might not be enough for Ebola