Big Head Means Big Brain and Less Alzheimer’s

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Big Head Means Big Brain and Less Alzheimer’s

Scientists from Technische Universität München, the University of Cambridge, Boston University School of Public Health and the University of California studied the relation between the brain size and the tendency of suffering from Alzheimer's disease, working on 270 patients already diagnosed with the disease.

The report, published by this team of scientists, revealed that patients with bigger brains have more brain cells. Consequently, their cognitive performance is relatively better, comparing with other patients with smaller brains, even if the percentages of their damaged brain cells, due to Alzheimer's disease, are the same. The proportion of brain cells infected by the disease was estimated by an MRI scan.

Scientists are developing much interest in the field of enhancing the performance of the brain before the age of 6, which means, before 93% of the human brain achieves its full size. By improving the brain's performance, the brain cells increase in number, which increases the size of the brain and lessens the chances of dementia. Scientists also aimed on finding the reasons and factors that result in patients developing Alzheimer's when reaching their 70s.

Nutrition, brain injuries and brain infections are found to affect the performance of the brain at the early ages which causes brain cells to ultimately fall for Alzheimer's disease in later life.


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