Suspicion Around Mental Health of Soldier Who Leaked Info to WikiLeaks

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Suspicion Around Mental Health of Soldier Who Leaked Info to WikiLeaks

On Wednesday, more information was revealed regarding the Army soldier who leaked classified material about the Army on WikiLeaks, an online website. This information mainly deals with the soldier’s mental stability.

David E. Coombs, the lawyer of accused Army soldier Private Bradley E. Manning, claimed that the Sergeant who was heading the operations in which Private was engaged in Baghdad last year had some doubts regarding the soldier’s psychological health. The Sergeant disabled his weapon, but kept him on with the intelligence analysis.

Now, Private Manning would be tested and will have to undergo through mental health examinations to prove his attorney’s claims. However, according to the Army’s records, Private’s behavior was suspiciously abnormal for the period between the months of November and May. The lawyer also included more data that the mental stability of the soldiers have been declining, according to a report written by the Private’s unit in Iraq.

Mr. Coombs also added to his claims that he personally does not think the private is responsible for any of these charges, especially after reading the unit’s report. He said if the sergeant in control detected such instabilities in the private’s behavior, why he kept him in his position, a position which grants him an access to highly classified information.


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