Scientists Find Link between CFS and XMRV

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Scientists Find Link between CFS and XMRV

According to a new study, the scientists have found a link between chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients and the Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related Virus (XMRV).

XMRV is similar to HIV and was discovered in the year 2006. The virus is relatively unknown in the medical world.

Following the new study, the Australian Red Cross Blood Service has decided to temporarily suspend donations from CFS sufferers.

Once more, studies will be conducted on XMRV and the Red Cross will review its decision within two years.

The XMRV studies were conducted by the Whittemore Peterson Institute for Neuro-Immune Disease and it was found that around 67% patients suffering from CFS tested positive for the retrovirus.

The findings could be helpful in understanding CFS, which affects as many as 180,000 people in Australia.

The diagnosis of CFS varies from one patient to another patient, because of different severity level.

According to a CFS/ME Working Group, less than 10% of patients recover completely from the disease. The recovery is rare in those patients, who are suffering from the disease for more than five years.

Presently, Queensland’s Bond University is doing a three-year study into CFS and the researchers are hopeful that a faster diagnosis method will be developed.


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