Scientists Find Link between CFS and XMRV

.

Scientists Find Link between CFS and XMRV

According to a new study, the scientists have found a link between chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients and the Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related Virus (XMRV).

XMRV is similar to HIV and was discovered in the year 2006. The virus is relatively unknown in the medical world.

Following the new study, the Australian Red Cross Blood Service has decided to temporarily suspend donations from CFS sufferers.

Once more, studies will be conducted on XMRV and the Red Cross will review its decision within two years.

The XMRV studies were conducted by the Whittemore Peterson Institute for Neuro-Immune Disease and it was found that around 67% patients suffering from CFS tested positive for the retrovirus.

The findings could be helpful in understanding CFS, which affects as many as 180,000 people in Australia.

The diagnosis of CFS varies from one patient to another patient, because of different severity level.

According to a CFS/ME Working Group, less than 10% of patients recover completely from the disease. The recovery is rare in those patients, who are suffering from the disease for more than five years.

Presently, Queensland’s Bond University is doing a three-year study into CFS and the researchers are hopeful that a faster diagnosis method will be developed.


Latest News

Memorial Day Sales Kicks Off with Retailers Offering Big Discounts
Coca Cola to Roll Out Limited Edition “Proud to be an American’ Cans this Weeken
Groups clash at Trump event in San Diego
Missouri declares emergency over heavy rains
U.S. Labor Secretary Announced Verizon and Unions have Reach an “Agreement in Pr
Different Reports Suggest Jawbone Might be in Trouble
U.S Economy Gaining Steam and Janet Yellen Hints at Interest Rate Increases in C
Hearing Scheduled on June 7 for Lawsuit over Redstone Trust
Scripps National Spelling Bee has co-champs for the third year
Officialsassumed Clinton used personal email for family and friends
Security Researchers Find Connection between Digital Attacks on Asian Banks and
Trump’s Energy Proposals Considered “Frightening” by Environmental Advocates