UND team ranked on top in the UAV competition

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UND team ranked on top in the UAV competition

An event that attracted many eyeballs towards itself in the past few days, a team of students from the University of North Dakota finally ranked on the top of the annual unmanned aerial systems competition in Australia. It is to be mentioned here that the team from the UND defeated 10 other teams in the UAV Outback Search and Rescue competition before it finally came to an end in Kingaroy, Queensland.

While the goal of the competition is to first locate a life-sized dummy known as "Outback Joe," then deliver him a water bottle, it may be noted here that the UND team became the first one to locate the prized target in the past four years.

For the record, the winning was able to find out the dummy's location within 15 meters from about 800 feet above ground level.

Apart from winning the $15,000 in prize money, the school officials also pointed out that the it hasn't come to a decision as to how it will be spending the winning amount.

Keeping in mind the fact that Mechanical engineering professor William Semke is the UND team's adviser, the pole position of the team is more than justified.


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