Major Departures in Microsoft Leads to Promotions for Others

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Major Departures in Microsoft Leads to Promotions for Others

The Seattle Times have reported the promotion of three of Microsoft’s Executives to the post of Presidents.

The news has come, following the announcement of departures of Xbox stalwarts, Robbie Bach and J Allard. So the responsibility has been laid on Kurt DelBene, Don Mattrick and Andy Lees who now have Presidential posts with them.

Having worked for Microsoft for the past 18 years, DelBene, 50 has been promoted to the post of President to lead its Office. He would reportedly be heading the Business division of SharePoint and Office. He is said to be succeeding Stephen Elop, who is to join Nokia Corporation as a CEO.

Don Mattrick is due to head and lead the Interactive Entertainment Business as a President. He is said to have been promoted to the President post from the post of Vice President.

"Don and his team have increased our Xbox 360 installed base from 10 million to more than 42 million worldwide, and grown Xbox LIVE membership from 6 million to more than 25 million”, said Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO.

Andy Lees would be taking over the Mobile Communication Business division. He is said to be working with Microsoft for the past 20 years.


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