Secondary Mechanism for Storing Memory, Says Scientists

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Secondary Mechanism for Storing Memory, Says Scientists

The Australian and the U. S. scientists have found that there is a second way the brain can store the information. The neuroscientists say that the finding could lead to other ways of treating brain diseases.

Bryce Vissel, who is the researcher in Garvan Institute, believes that the new finding can bring a new lease of life for people suffering from brain injury or Alzheimer's disease.

For the last two or three decades, the researchers had the idea that NMDA receptor in the hippocampus of the brain controls the memory of a person.

Dr. Vissel said, "Now that we've discovered this second mechanism, now that we've kicked this idea off, we can start to think about ... [developing] drugs that work on this second mechanism".

He further said his team was trying to artificially replicate the process of the NMDA receptor, when they came to know about the second method.

They found that the replication happens naturally and there is no need to do it artificially.

The scientists have coined the new learning mechanism as `second learning'. It was a `Eureka!' moment for them when the discovered it.

The findings of the study have been published online in the journal PloS ONE.


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