Scientists in Singapore Develop Breakthrough Medical Device

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Scientists in Singapore Develop Breakthrough Medical Device

Scientists in Singapore have been able to develop a new medical tool that would be able to forecast whether some is about to experience a heart attack. The medical tool is a non-invasive procedure and involves the calculation of a patient’s Heart Rate Variability.

The Heart Rate Variability is the difference of intervals between the heartbeats of a person; the new tool would allow the doctors to check whether a patient would suffer a cardiac arrest in the following 72 hours. A study that has been conducted in relation to the tool has stated that after a combination with conventional procedures, the accuracy levels rose by 50%.

A consultant at the Department of Emergency Medicine in Singapore General Hospital, Professor Marcus Ong has stated that the new procedure would help doctors in making more accurate decision regarding the health of patient suffering from heart diseases. Such a procedure, according to Professor Ong would especially benefit doctors in high stress medical facilities, like the Singapore General Hospital itself.

It took researchers at the Singapore General Hospital and Nanyang Technological University five years to develop the miraculous medical device. The researchers are currently working with commercial partners to work out the development of a commercial release.


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