Google adds hacked site notifications to search results

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Google adds hacked site notifications to search results

In an attempt to alert users about the dangers of traveling to a supposedly compromised site, Internet search biggie Google Friday announced that it has added extra notification to search results.

The move, which comes in the wake of the recent Gawker hacks as well as the `Operation Payback' denial of service attacks by pro-WikiLeaks activists, will also partly address the challenge caused by black hat search engine optimization (SEO), since most attackers use the SEO mechanism to entice victims their sites.

With Google associate product manager Gideon Wald stating in a blog post that that Google will use a "variety of automated tools to detect common signs of a hacked site," the company said that when it believes a particular site has been hacked, it will add a warning sentence below the search result. The sentence would read: "This site may be compromised."

Wald also drew attention to the fact that Google has already been providing warning notices for malware for years; and added that the company is now expanding the search results notifications "to help people avoid sites that may have been compromised and altered by a third party, typically for spam."

Furthermore, Wald also added that the users can get additional information about the notice by clicking the alert; and can also click the result itself and be taken to the site if they so desire.


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