Cholera Outbreak Stimulate Research Work

.

Cholera Outbreak Stimulate Research Work

Cholera bacterium is declared as more fatal, by the researchers. As per the wide range of study , published in Journal Public Library of Science, hybrid strain of cholera has underwent a huge change in the span of 20 years, resulting in spiraling growth in mortality rate of cholera patients.

According to Edward Ryan, a researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University in the United States blamed the hybrid strain of cholera, as the potential cause of significant shoot up in the fatality rate, showed by the recent outbreaks.

In a recent outbreak in Zimbabwe, which lasts for almost a year, health officials blamed the delay in medical interventions, the possible cause of mass massacre caused by cholera. With many such incidents reported in Asia, the study appealed for per-emptive efforts to control the cholera outbreak.

Though mass vaccination has been recommended by the health experts , many experts have opined their concern over the effective results of vaccination. Meanwhile, another study examined the impact of oral vaccines in Vietnam, and claimed 76% in Hanoi, saved by the vaccine.

Ryan acknowledged the research work done in the field of cholera outbreak, and appealed for further probe to adapt to the changing scenarios. Further, he asserted that for the last 30 years, the treatment has been focused on combating short term impact of cholera on the patients.


Latest News

PARK(ing) Day Celebration Turns Parking Spots into Temporary Parks
Oasis Beverages a Russian Company Buys Pabst
About 6.4 trillion calories to be cut from food products
Rise in sexually transmitted infections worry all
Breast cancer awareness taken to another level by foundation
Practicing yoga can help bipolar disorder
Oracle’s Chief Larry Ellison Retires
Price of Alibaba IPO Remains at Top Range
Artificial sweeteners might trigger diabetes
World Alzheimer’s Report Suggests Dementia Can Be Preventable
Artificial spleen can rid the body of infections
Obese can lean down through social networking sites: Study