Disputes over Android Being Termed as the Top Smartphone Platform in Q4 2010

.

Disputes over Android Being Termed as the Top Smartphone Platform in Q4 2010

As per sources, Android has been termed as the top smartphone platform in Q4 2010; however a new report from Gartner is disputing the claim.

Gartner states that with the help of Symbian-based products by Fujitsu and Sharp, and legacy products from Sony Ericsson and Samsung, Symbian had barely edged out Android.

Gartner claims that Android had grown 888.8% in the year 2010 with 67 million units sold, which obviously made it the number-two smartphone platform and not one. Whereas, Nokia’s Symbian with 111.6 million units sold in 2010 still continued to be on the first place.

However it was not growing fast enough to keep up with the exploding smartphone market. This was the reason why it dropped from 46.9% market share in 2009 to 37.6% in 2010.
Also besides Android in 2010 was Apple’s iOS which happened to catch around with RIM’s BlackBerry OS, with almost 15.7% market share and 46.6 million units sold in comparison to RIM’s 16% share and 47.5 million units sold.

It is expected that Symbian’s market share will surely drop some more in the coming time. Nokia CEO Stephen Elop is said to have announced radical changes and said that Nokia was on its verge of embracing Microsoft’s mobile platform, Windows Phone 7.


Latest News

Fourth Quarter Loss Posted by Walgreen
Steve Wynn, Casino Magnate Says Gambling Industry is not about Slot Machines
News Corp. to Buy Move Inc. for $950 million
Will PayPal soon Look for Mergers with Mobile Payment Services to fight Competit
Ford Shares Drop With Profit Concerns
Dominion LNG Export Project Gets Green Signal from FERC
Second Quarter Shows Fastest Growth of U.S Economy
Stronger Safeguarding Rules for Service Members Against Predatory Lenders
Yahoo Urged to Buy Rival AOL Inc.
Slowing Down of Inflation May Make it Difficult for BOJ to Achieve its Target
B.K. Modi’s CIO Plans to Start Pre-IPO Fund
American Soda makers Promise to Trim Twenty Percent Calories by 2025