Infant Mortality Decreases by 60%

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Infant Mortality Decreases by 60%

In just one generation, the rate of infant mortality has gone down by 60%, which experts attribute to the better medical care and technology that has been made available to expectant mothers. In 1980, there were approximately 12 deaths per 1,000 live births, but in 2009, the number per 1,000 went down to 4.5. However, babies of young mothers, especially teenage mothers, are at a higher risk of dying after birth.

According the Andy Cole, the Chief Executive of Bliss, a baby special care charity said, “Bliss welcomes these findings, in particular the improvement in infant mortality and neonatal mortality in recent years”. Cole also stated that throughout Europe, Wales and England have some of the highest infant mortality rates and that a lot could still be done to make them go down.

On the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, Milwaukee, Wisconsin’s infant mortality rate was the worst in the nation at 11 per 1,000 in 2009. The year 2010 saw a 14% drop in infant mortality. According to city officials, premature births were the leading force behind the high number of infant deaths, but as of Thursday no information was available about how exactly the babies died.


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