Technical Gadgets Help in Recovery after Stroke

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Technical Gadgets Help in Recovery after Stroke

According to a study by the American Heart Association, it has been found that the use of technical gadgets helps in improving the strength of arm after stroke.

Researchers said that people who played video games and virtual reality games were found more energetic in comparison to the people who received conventional physical therapy. People who participated in rehabilitation with virtual reality technologies have shown more improvement than others.

Patients who played technical gadgets showed 4.89 times more improvement then patients who received therapy after the stroke.

The Conventional physical therapies are specially made for the recovery of patient after stroke like playing piano keys.

Mindy Levin, PhD, a professor in the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy at McGill University in Montreal said that the study helps people to be more creative and to work hard for their rapid improvements.

The study revealed that most of the patients played for around 20 to 30 hours in four to six week time span.

Gustavo Saposnik, M. D., M. Sc., the lead author of the study said that reality games have more potential rather than therapy for the improvement in patient after stroke.

He added, “Virtual reality gaming therapy may provide an affordable, enjoyable and effective alternative to intensify treatment and promote motor recovery after stroke".


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