Braiding Causes Baldness - New Data

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Braiding Causes Baldness

It has been seen that most of the African American women like to braid or tightly weave their hair.  This hairstyle is considered to never go out of fashion. In a new research it has been confirmed that such braiding or tight weaving can cause permanent hair loss.

As per the study done by the researchers in the United States of America the hair is constantly pulled in this hairstyle. This prolonged pulling of the hair can cause inflammation of the hair follicle.

The researchers claim that this inflammation of the hair follicle can lead to central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia. The central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is also known as a scarring hair loss. This particular kind of balding starts at top of the scalp. Once this partial balding has started it will spread to the entire scalp.

The research was led by Angela Kyei, of the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. The study is based on scalp examination reports and health questionnaires of more than 326 African American women.

It was confirmed that every one out of six women studied has faced the problem of the central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia. Out of all the women facing the problem of scarring hair loss more than half of them braided their hair.


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