Study: Installed Traps In Diesel Engines Reduce Pollution Levels

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Study: Installed Traps In Diesel Engines Reduce Pollution Levels

As per the findings of a new study, the traps that are installed in the diesel engines can actually reduce the spread of microbes that are harmful for the heart health.

The study conducted by the researchers from the British Heart Foundation recruited some 20 seemingly healthy men for the study.

They were then randomly asked to inhale the gas from unfiltered diesel-engine exhaust, filtered diesel-engine exhaust and filtered air along with the simultaneous rest and exercising.

It was then found that where the trap removed approximately 98% of dust particles in the diesel exhaust, as many as 99.8% of the most deadly microbes were removed quite successfully.

Moreover, it was unveiled that there were no significant differences in the clotting behavior in the people who inhaled filtered diesel exhaust and filtered air.

All the subjects in the trial group were non-smokers. The scientists have been very impressed with the study findings and believe that an easy process of installing a filter in the diesel engine can effectively cut the risks of heart diseases to a great extent.

Dr. Robert D. Brook from the University of Michigan stated: "These findings strongly support the concept that reducing the particulate pollution associated with diesel, and likely other combustion sources of air pollution, can lead to substantial improvements in cardiovascular health”.


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