Early Diagnosis and ACT Treatment Could Completely Eliminate Malaria

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Early Diagnosis and ACT Treatment Could Completely Eliminate Malaria

Malaria is widespread in Africa and many other countries. It claims the lives of more than 800,000 people in the world every year and most of them are children.

Experts advise that malaria could be completely eliminated by early diagnosis and rapid and timely treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Malaria is a parasitic disease which occurs as a result of mosquito bite.

About 3.3 million people are living with a risk of developing mosquito-borne disease. A large number of initiatives are taken by various authorities to eradicate malaria. Increased resources are provided by The Global Fund to fight HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria, the World Bank, UNITAID and the US President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) in several countries, including France and the United Kingdom to combat against malaria. A number of counselors, advisors, businessmen and women have become local partners in the global movement to Roll Back Malaria.

Besides funds, the experts of various authorities contribute their innovative academic thinking, strategies and support to overcome the problem. The authorities are making a significant progress towards the elimination of the disease and they have a goal of zero malaria deaths by 2015.


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