Montana Governor Passively Brings New Marijuana Bill into Law

.

Montana Governor Passively Brings New Marijuana Bill into Law

Governor of Montana Brian Schweitzer said he would let a law restricting the medical marijuana business in his state to become a law without his signature.

He said that even though he wasn’t happy about some parts of the bill that allowed for some of the state’s largest marijuana growing locations to be shut down, he preferred to have the new rules instead of the current system which he compared to “the wild, wild west”.

The state of Montana has had a hard time managing the medical marijuana business ever since voters approved it for their state in 2004 that allowed patients to have marijuana if their doctors wrote them a prescription for it. Since then, the number of people smoking pot has gone up to around 30,000 and the number of people dispensing the drug has gone up exponentially as well.

Under the new bill, patients will have to provide stronger proof for their illness in order to get a prescription for cannabis, and they would be allowed to either grow it for themselves or get it for free from a provider that grows for as many as three individuals.

He said that because the provision to grow your own marijuana may cut access to patients who need it, that law makers should keep this issue in mind the next time they meet.


Latest News

Rise in Russian Arms Sales In spite of a Drop Globally
PetSmart Sells itself with an $8.3Billion Deal
Falling Oil Prices Result in a Drop in Stocks
Shares of Amaya Fall Due to Probe Conducted by Securities Regulators
Americans Consumers Display Confidence In the Market with Gain in Sales
It’s Time to Hurry Up to Enrol in the First Phase of Affordable Care Act Health
After Merger with Alliance Boots,	Walgreen CEO will Retire
Falling Fuel Prices Lift Airline Profits But No Respite in Fares Expected
Citigroup to Pay Likely $2.7B as Legal Charge
Michael Jeffries Retires as the CEO of Abercrombie & Fitch
Deutsche Bank in Trouble Again in the U.S. for Alleged Tax Scheme
Popular Demand Brings French Toast Crunch Back on the Shelves