Gel to Replace Back Surgery for Worn Out Disc

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Gel to Replace Back Surgery for Worn Out Disc

All those who have been bearing the awful pain of backs need not to bear any more as scientists at Manchester University have invented a liquid that turns into a durable gel in the spine and provide relief from back aches caused by worn out discs.

It is hoped by the scientists that the jabs would bring an end to painful surgery for those who endure chronic back pain. Doctors will also be able to use the gel on the patients who shows first signs of worn out disc.

The lead researcher, Dr. Brian Saunders, said, "It's a gel so it contains a lot of water and contracts and re-expands". He further said the present treatment for worn out disc is severe which requires spinal fusion and it take a patient months to recover from it.

The gel has been experimented over cow's tail it is yet to be tried on human. Dr. Saunders believes that the gel will be ready to be used on human being after five years. The gel is made up of thousands of microscopic sponge-like particles that inflate and gel together inside the body.

Professor Tony Freemont, a co-author of the study, said that the gel will not only help in curing the back pain but will also save country's money as the treatment for worn out disc costs the country billions of pounds per annum and causes untold misery for sufferers and their families.


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