WHO Study Reveals New Swine Flu Strain is Resistant to Drugs

WHO Study Reveals New Swine Flu Strain is Resistant to Drugs

A recent research by the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza in Melbourne, Australia, has revealed a unique gene mutation of swine flu which seems to be immunized to anti-viral drugs.

With this news hitting the headlines of leading newspapers, makers of the questioned anti-viral drugs, including Relenza, made by GlaxoSmithKline, and Tamiflu, made by Roche and Gilead Sciences, have come under the scanner.

Confirming the results, WHO‘s Dr. Ian Barr claimed, "This mutation wouldn't change the treatment a doctor might give those people. So really it's just steady as she goes and really I wouldn't be too concerned about this new mutation”.

Supposedly, shares of Durham, North Carolina-based BioCryst Pharmaceuticals moved up by 15% on Monday, as the new strain is found to be effective for swine flu. Apparently, this report has pushed research work in the field of flu vaccine. To start with it, BioCryst is reported to be working on successful experimentation of developing Peramivir, funded by the Federal Government.

Meanwhile, there are confirmed reports that GlaxoSmithKline is escalating investment by $39 million to acquire 51% stake in Shenzhen Neptunus Interlong Bio-Technique Co to make flu vaccines in China.

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