Mother’s Smoke During Pregnancy Increase Their Child’s Chances of Heart Failures

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Mother’s Smoke During Pregnancy Increase Their Child’s Chances of Heart Failures

Women who smoke during pregnancy are also increasing their child’s chances of having a heart attack or stroke by 20%.

The University of Sydney conducted a study which discovered that eight-year-old children, whose mothers smoked, had lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol which is known to aid the body against heart disease. This means that they have a higher risk of heart failures than children whose mothers didn’t smoke during pregnancy.

Though the study was conducted on children from Sydney, the results can be applied to children in the West as well. Those children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy will need to have the health monitored closely to watch for risks of heart failures, such as high blood pressure. The study also looked at other factors that could affect the likelihood of heart failure, such as weight, age and exercise. However the study found that children whose mothers smoked during and after pregnancy had a significant impact on their child’s health.

Health experts suggest these children have a 20% higher risk of heart attack and stroke in their lifetime.

Celermager, a Professor in cardiology, warns mothers to quit smoking before the plan a pregnancy. “[Children} can't turn back the clock now - they have to be particularly careful of the way they live their lives to maximize their heart health by not smoking themselves and by having healthy diet and exercise habits”.

 


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