Texas Gets Another Reason to Be Recognized

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Texas Gets Another Reason to Be Recognized

Texas has many reasons to its identification and one more was added to its kitty and that was now it has the biggest baby ever born in the state. Janet Johnson gave birth to a baby boy named as Ja Michael who weighed 16lbs 1oz.

Good Shepherd Hospital staff in Longview, Texas has told Janet during her baby shower that her newly born would be big and due to that she told her friends to not to get anything for his baby. Doctors knew that the child would be big but did not expect this much as the kid is equivalent to a child of three to six months.

According to Janet’s medical reports, she was diagnosed with gestational diabetes during her pregnancy and this could be a reason for baby’s size. Mary Beth Smith, nurse told that JaMichael parents would have a difficulty to maintain their sugar level.

JaMichael, is in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and getting food and breathing assistance there. His father, Michael Brown is stunned by the fact that their child is known name in the state and is known as ‘The Moose’ in the hospital.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the biggest new born weighed 23 pounds, 12 ounces but could not survive more than 11 hours.


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