Women with the History of Domestic Violence Prone To Mental Illness

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Women with the History of Domestic Violence Prone To Mental Illness

A new study has found that women inflicted of domestic violence are more prone of developing mental illness. The findings of the study have been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

According to the researchers of the study, women victims of rape, sexual assault, stalking, or intimate-partner violence are at higher risk of developing mental illnesses. The researchers have blamed poor mental health of women for making them to succumb to mental illnesses.

Supporting the findings of the study, Andrea Gielen, Sc. D., Director for the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Johns Hopkins University said, “When professionals are treating women with depression or mental health issues, it's best to be clued in to the fact that violence might be behind [it]”.

For the study, the researchers analyzed health data from a nationally representative sample of Australian women between the ages of 16 and 85. During the study, the incidents of sexual assault, stalking, and other "gender-based violence" were kept in mind. The researchers found that 75% of women with depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress, substance abuse, or anxiety had a history of abuse while 28% of women were subject of sexual abuse in their past.


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