Cartoons Not Good for Kids, SpongeBob Leads the Race

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Cartoons Not Good for Kids, SpongeBob Leads the Race

Things which are meant to provide entertainment are actually full filling their responsibilities, is a big question as for long time cartoons, which are thought to be great friends of children are not living up to their status as now increased violence is shown in cartoons and many other things are shown which harms the overall development of a child.

Recently, a research was conducted by Angeline Lillard and her team from Virginia University. They took SpongeBob SquarePants, a cartoon character as their topic and noticed its effects on children. It is a fast-paced character and harms children in many ways.

To confirm this, they allocated three different activities to three different groups for nine minutes. One group had to watch SpongeBob SquarePants cartoon for nine minutes, second group watched other cartoon character, but which were slow-paced, while third group had to draw graphics.

After nine minutes they were given some mental strength assessing test, in which it was discovered that even nine minutes of watching this fast-paced cartoon character could have a serious harm on kids. And, these kids performed the worst in the test. As per researchers, these kids would face difficulty while concentrating on things as well as while studying. Even they would not obey to elders' orders as well as would not be competent enough to solve problems by themselves.


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