Demand for Edible Insects Rising

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Demand for Edible Insects Rising

Farmers from New South Wales are all geared up as the sales of their crickets, snails, mealworms and silkworms is to rise in near future after the revelation that they are the low fat foods, with low cholesterol, high in minerals and contain double protein if compared to meat and fish.

Entomophagists are the people who eat bugs and due to the rising popularity of culinary insects, it has been observed that a few farmers will be expanding the production of scorpions and tarantulas as the demand for all these bugs have been rising.

Australian Agricultural Minister Joe Ludwig's spokesperson notified that though the government has no intentions to encourage the culinary insects industry still a large number of restaurants have been involved in such cuisines and people are enjoying the food.

According to UN, the edible insects could prove beneficial for consumers as they contain large amount of nutrients.

One of the farmers producing insects said the insects are very popular among food items and some people have incorporated them in their every day meals, so there is a need to strengthen the production as well.

Meanwhile, European Union recently declared $4.9 million funding to support the production and trading of these culinary insects. Also, food standards regulators have been asked to promote such insects for consumption by revealing their actual benefits.


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