Japan to Use Slime for Designing Future Transport Network

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Japan to Use Slime for Designing Future Transport Network

Japanese scientists could soon use a so-called brainless primeval organism (efficient to navigate through a maze) to design an ideal transport network for the region.

In recent times, amoeboid yellow slime mould had been announced but scientists have recently claimed that the mould could soon prove to be very vital for the high-tech life. The scientists from Japan are planning to use the slime as an important key in designing future bio-computers that would be capable of solving the most complex of problems around.

In context to the same, some comments came from Mr. Toshiyuki Nakagaki, a professor at the Future University Hakodate. The professional cleared in his statement that their plans of using the slime for routing the best possible transport network are based on the fact that slime is an organism that perfectly organizes all of its cells, enabling the creation of the best and the most direct route through any toughest maze to find a source of food.

Mr. Nakagaki further added that the slime organism has cells that are efficient enough to gather and perfectly segregate all the information related to processing the target, and thereby allowing it to move on the same route at which the mould grows in an effort to reach its food along with avoiding stresses, such as light, that could damage them.

“Humans are not the only living things with information-processing abilities”, said Prof. Nakagaki, in his laboratory in Hakodate on Japan's northernmost island of Hokkaido.

“Simple creatures can solve certain kinds of difficult puzzles. If you want to spotlight the essence of life or intelligence, it's easier to use these simple creatures”, Nakagaki added, while claiming that the slime mold, an organism that inhabits decaying leaves and logs and eats bacteria, will make it the simplest of all.


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