WHO Approves Disclosure of Controversial Research into Bird Flu

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WHO Approves Disclosure of Controversial Research into Bird Flu

It seems that the months' long controversy surrounding the public disclosure of a research into bird flu has finally been put to rest. It was announced by the meeting of 22 experts at the headquarters of the World Health Organization that the research findings of bird flu which has had created havoc in countries from Indonesia to Egypt would be published.

It might take some two months for the research work to make public. The research material is told to have vital information about who to make versions of the virus which could prove out to be fatal for humans. Deciphering the severity of the research work, it was told that such research work must be kept under covers else it could be used for malicious purpose.

"There is a preference from a public health perspective for full disclosure of the information in these two studies. However there are significant public concerns surrounding this research that should first be addressed”, said the WHO's Assistant Director-General for health security and environment, Keiji Fukuda.

The meeting was actually called upon to break the long running stiffness between the researchers in The Netherlands and the United States, and Biosecurity experts. There were esteem members from medical fraternity involved in the meeting. It was being believed by majority there that there is need for research work of this level to be revealed so that subsequent steps could be taken to combat the deadly virus.

As of now, the H5N1 virus, which was first found in Hong Kong in 1997, has infected nearly 600 people worldwide since 2003. It was only after it came to notice that the research work could instigate threat to humans that the U. S. National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB) came into picture and called for it to be zipped up.

While the research would make its way in the public domain soon, there is need for scientific fraternity to make sure that they are well prepared to fight the fatal virus.


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