Campaign Ad Kicks Controversy

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Campaign Ad Kicks Controversy

In 2007, an ad was originated by Romney’s campaign named Searched; it was for the president at that time. Now in 2012, during the presidential campaign, a Republican candidate Mitt Romney has aired the same ad in an improper way. The super PACs have supported him and in this regard, a watchdog group has condemned it. There has been a growing controversy against this group now.

Paul Ryan is a lawyer for the Campaign Legal Center and he is a specialist in federal election law. As told by him, the Super PAC has been unfair for spending on the re-airing of this ad.

Ryan also said, "The rule says what matters is a person that republished campaign material - material created by a candidate or campaign committee or any agent thereof - the money spent is treated as a contribution to that candidate. It is flatly illegal for a super PAC to give money to a candidate".

This ad supported by the super PAC is known as Saved. It was on Thursday, when this ad started airing in Michigan and Arizona. It is very similar to the ad Searched. Both of these ads feature Robert Gay, who is the former business partner of Romney.

Romney decided to finish off his business at Bain capital and he brought 50 employees to New York City for searching Gay's daughter who at the age of 14 was snacked away from her house.

The only difference between these two ads is that the Restore Our Future ad finishes saying, "Brought to you by Restore Our Future" whereas the 2007 Romney campaign ad ends saying "I'm Mitt Romney and I approved this message".


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