New Photographs of Saturn’s Moon Captured

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New Photographs of Saturn’s Moon Captured

According to sources, new photographs of Saturn’s second largest moon are out. The photographs have been captured from a very less distance of 26,000 miles. These photographs have been captured by Cassini spacecraft.

Rhea, which is one of the four moons of Saturn, was first observed by an Italian astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini in 1672. It is 950 miles in diameter.

The spacecraft used to gather information about Saturn and its moon, Cassini was launched in October 1997. It was a mutual project funded by both NASA and the European Agency. The spacecraft was moved to the planet for studies in the year 2004.

The photographs captured clearly show the pockmarked surface of the moon. During the flyby, it was easy to capture the 30-frame mosaic of Rhea’s leading hemisphere and the side of the moon that did not face the planet.

Two large impact basins, the 300-mile-wide Mimaldi basin and the 200-mile Tirawa basin were clearly seen in the photographs. A very young feature was seen on the surface, crater Inktomi, which is 29 miles wide.

This project is a cooperative work of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena manages the mission for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL.


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