No More Printing, Britannica Goes Digital

.

No More Printing, Britannica Goes Digital

In another indication of the swelling supremacy of the digital publishing world and concerns, the age-old English-language encyclopedia, Britannica, which is still in printing, is now moving exclusively into a digital epoch.

The famous Encyclopedia Britannica, which is continuously being printed ever since its first issue was out in Edinburgh, Scotland during 1768. Earlier on Tuesday, it was claimed that it will end its publication on pages, i. e. printed versions of the encyclopedia will be gone, and will carry on with its digital versions that is accessible online.

The 32-volume printed and flagship edition, which is made available after every second year, was earlier sold for an amount of $1400. An e-subscription will be pegged at $70 on a yearly basis and the company has only recently rolled out a group of apps scoping from $1.99 to $4.99 monthly.

The company has also made it clear that it will be keeping on with its sales of print editions till the time the present stock of nearly 4000 sets dry out. It is the said to be the latest move made by Encyclopedia Britannica for the sake of expanding its reference of Internet services and for moving further deep into a world of educational products.

It first flirted with digital publishing in the 1970s, published a version for computers in 1981 for LexisNexis subscribers and first posted to the Internet in 1994.

While expressing his opinion regarding the end of paper edition and the shifting of the entire momentum towards digital edition, the President of Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc., Jorge Cauz, informed media sources: "The print edition became more difficult to maintain and wasn't the best physical element to deliver the quality of our database and the quality of our editorial".


Latest News

Video Shows Baby Turtles Heading to Sea
Bear Stearns, Alan 'Ace' Greenberg, dies at 86
Former U.S. official Says President Obama Could Restrain Corporate 'Inversions'
As U.S. Stocks Ascend, NYC Pension Funds Report 17.4%  Returns on Investments
Food Scandal in China, Parent Company to Investigate Matters
Wal-Mart’s New Fix-it Man Has Never Worked in U.S Before
Obama Steps Up Drive to Stop Tax Loopholes for  “Corporate Deserters”
Widening Quarterly Losses Pull Down Amazon Shares
New Zealand Once Again Raises Its Interest Rate Now to 3.5 Percent
UN Human Development Report Points at Inequality for Slow Progress
Facebook Perched to Reach a Record High After Heavy Quarterly Gains
July HSBC Survey Reveal China PMI at All Time High in 18-months