No More Printing, Britannica Goes Digital

.

No More Printing, Britannica Goes Digital

In another indication of the swelling supremacy of the digital publishing world and concerns, the age-old English-language encyclopedia, Britannica, which is still in printing, is now moving exclusively into a digital epoch.

The famous Encyclopedia Britannica, which is continuously being printed ever since its first issue was out in Edinburgh, Scotland during 1768. Earlier on Tuesday, it was claimed that it will end its publication on pages, i. e. printed versions of the encyclopedia will be gone, and will carry on with its digital versions that is accessible online.

The 32-volume printed and flagship edition, which is made available after every second year, was earlier sold for an amount of $1400. An e-subscription will be pegged at $70 on a yearly basis and the company has only recently rolled out a group of apps scoping from $1.99 to $4.99 monthly.

The company has also made it clear that it will be keeping on with its sales of print editions till the time the present stock of nearly 4000 sets dry out. It is the said to be the latest move made by Encyclopedia Britannica for the sake of expanding its reference of Internet services and for moving further deep into a world of educational products.

It first flirted with digital publishing in the 1970s, published a version for computers in 1981 for LexisNexis subscribers and first posted to the Internet in 1994.

While expressing his opinion regarding the end of paper edition and the shifting of the entire momentum towards digital edition, the President of Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc., Jorge Cauz, informed media sources: "The print edition became more difficult to maintain and wasn't the best physical element to deliver the quality of our database and the quality of our editorial".


Latest News

Report: Stock conditions for new iPhones at Apple retail stores will improve by
Apple’s new ‘macOS Sierra’ version brings Siri to desktop; unfolds several other
SquareTrade conducts dunk/drop tests on iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, Galaxy Note 7
Samsung sued over exploded Galaxy Note 7 handset
Only 13% US Galaxy Note 7 users have exchanged their potentially explosive hands
Uber’s self-driving cars hit Pittsburg roads under a test program
Phil Schiller: Removal of headphone jack marks Apple’s desire for technological
Samsung, CPSC ask Galaxy Note 7 owners to stop using their handsets
Analyst: iPhone 7 will be packaged with EarPods which use Lightning connector
Spacecom may seek $50M or free flight from SpaceX to cover the cost of now-destr
Alphabet is shifting some Nest engineers to Google
Apple sued by iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners affected by ‘Touch Disease’ prob